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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

The Influence of Shear Layer Turbulence on Stationary Pseudoblades in Supersonic Pressure Exchange Inducing Flow Fields

[+] Author and Article Information
Kartik V. Bulusu1

Post-doctoral Scientist Member of ASME Biofluid Dynamics Laboratory,  The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052bulusu@gwmail.gwu.edu

Charles A. Garris

Professor of Engineering Fellow of ASME Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052garris@gwu.edu

Supersonic Cone version 1.0.2 is a Java program developed by Joseph A. Huwaldt. This program was validated with NASA cone flow tables (Ref. [19]) for a limited range of upstream Mach numbers, semivertex angle of one cones and oblique shock angles.

1

Corresponding author. Research was conducted while Kartik V. Bulusu was a D.Sc. candidate at The George Washington University.

J. Fluids Eng 133(11), 111102 (Oct 24, 2011) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004946 History: Received January 05, 2011; Revised August 22, 2011; Published October 24, 2011; Online October 24, 2011

The pressure exchange process can be initiated by nonsteady pressure forces that arise due to moving fluid dynamic interfaces in the laboratory frame of reference. The fluid interfaces are flow features of “pseudoblades” that can be generated by an expanding supersonic primary flow, impinging on freely spinning cone-vane type of rotors. These pseudoblades are fluidic vanes that interface with an entrained, compressible secondary fluid and can mimic the action of impellers as in conventional turbomachinery. The overarching goal of this research is the development of a novel fluid impeller-based ejector. The authors’ motivation towards this study was in understanding the boundary conditions leading to spatial deterioration of pseudoblades. Flow around stationary, axisymmetrically aligned rotors (the ramp vane and double cone type), held in a primary supersonic flow field (Mach 1.44 jet), were investigated by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements of shear layer turbulence intensity (TI) under alternative seeding of primary and entrained secondary flows. Rotors were tested and compared for shear layer TI distribution-based boundary conditions, anticipated pseudoblade conditions and an “effective persistence length of stationary pseudoblades.” The results suggest that the double cone rotor is most conducive for pseudoblade stability. The TI distribution-based boundary conditions for this rotor indicate that the effective pseudoblade persistence length approximately equals the exit diameter of the supersonic nozzle.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematics of psuedoblades and entrainment gullies based on schlieren photography on all rotor configurations [2]

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Figure 2

Schematics of an axial crypto-steady pressure exchange ejector [17]

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Figure 3

Schematics of the experimental facility

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Figure 4

Experimental setup. (a) Forward scattering LDV system and the test rig. (b) Nozzle and arrows indicating primary and secondary flows.

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Figure 5

Nozzle and rotor assembly. (a) Ramp vane rotor aligned with Mach 1.4 nozzle. (b) Double cone rotor aligned with Mach 1.4 nozzle.

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Figure 6

Schematics of laser velocimeter measurement system

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Figure 7

Measurement grids. (a) Measurement grid for ramp vane rotor. (b) Measurement grid for double cone rotor.

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Figure 8

X component mean velocity for ramp vane rotor with seeded primary flow with a Mach 1.4 nozzle

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Figure 9

X component turbulence intensity for ramp vane rotor with seeded primary flow with a Mach 1.4 nozzle

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Figure 10

X component mean velocity for ramp vane rotor with seeded secondary flow with a Mach 1.4 nozzle

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Figure 11

X component turbulence intensity for ramp vane rotor with seeded secondary flow with a Mach 1.4 nozzle

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Figure 12

X component mean velocity for double cone rotor with seeded primary flow with a Mach 1.4 nozzle

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Figure 13

X component turbulence intensity for double cone rotor with seeded primary flow with a Mach 1.4 nozzle

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Figure 14

X component mean velocity for double cone rotor with seeded secondary flow with a Mach 1.4 nozzle

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Figure 15

X component turbulence intensity for double cone rotor with seeded secondary flow with a Mach 1.4 nozzle

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