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Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

A Compressible Permeation Approach to Elastomeric Space Seal Characterization

[+] Author and Article Information
Nicholas G. Garafolo2

College of Engineering,  The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3901nicholas.g.garafolo@uakron.edu

Christopher C. Daniels

College of Engineering,  The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3901cdaniels@uakron.edu

2

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 134(5), 051204 (May 22, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006418 History: Received January 31, 2011; Revised February 07, 2012; Published May 18, 2012; Online May 22, 2012

The development of elastomeric face seals is imperative for NASA’s manned space flight program. Lacking in the development of state-of-the-art space seals was a technique for predicting the performance of candidate designs prior to experimental characterization. To this end, a physics-based model for compressible permeation in elastomeric face seals was developed to provide a predictive methodology for designers and researchers. In this novel approach for seal research, compressibility effects and the dependence of permeability on pressure was retained. Two independent permeation parameters arose from an exact, analytical solution to the one-dimensional permeation transport equations. The application of the derived transport equations and the developed permeability coefficients resulted in a noteworthy and practical tool for seal researchers to predict the leak rate of alternative geometries. For an example in the methodology, the characterization of a candidate space seal material, silicone elastomer S0383-70, was performed. Results illustrated the model’s capability for capturing the permeation leak rate of elastomeric seals for various pressure differentials.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 10

Permeability coefficient for constant permeability model at + 50 °C for specimen “A”

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Figure 11

Comparison of model prediction to experimental results for specimen “A” at + 23 °C

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Figure 12

Comparison of silicone elastomer S0383-70 model permeation parameters against experimental results for all test specimens at + 23 °C and + 50 °C

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Figure 13

Comparison of model prediction of specimen “A” with permeation parameters developed with specimen “B” at + 23 °C

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Figure 14

Comparison of model prediction of specimen “B” with permeation parameters developed with specimen “A” at + 50 °C

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Figure 3

Illustration of a section view of the test apparatus and specimen

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Figure 4

Photograph of the test apparatus and test specimen

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Figure 5

Mass regression of specimen “A” at + 23 °C at 101.4 kPa [differential]

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Figure 6

Experimental leak rates for specimen “A” at + 23 °C

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Figure 7

Permeability of dry air in silicone elastomer S0383-70 at + 23 °C and + 50 °C

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Figure 8

Diffusion coefficient at + 50 °C for specimen “A”

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Figure 9

Under-prediction of leak rate by the diffusion model at + 50 °C for specimen “A”, with a coefficient of 0.047

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Figure 1

Pressure profiles for various Klinkenberg coefficients

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Figure 2

Illustration of top and side views of the test specimen

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