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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Considerations on a Mass-Based System Representation of a Pneumatic Cylinder

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Brian Thomas

Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, SH 221 Cleveland, OH 44115-2214m.thomas.84@csuohio.edu

Gary P. Maul

Department of Industrial, Welding, and Systems Engineering, The Ohio State University, 210 Baker Systems, 1971 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210maul.1@osu.edu

J. Fluids Eng 131(4), 041101 (Mar 06, 2009) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3089533 History: Received July 25, 2007; Revised December 22, 2008; Published March 06, 2009

Pneumatic actuators can be advantageous over electromagnetic and hydraulic actuators in many servo motion applications. The difficulty in their practical use comes from the highly nonlinear dynamics of the actuator and control valve. Previous works have used the cylinder’s position, velocity, and internal pressure as state variables in system models. This paper replaces pressure in the state model with the mass of gas in each chamber of the cylinder, giving a better representation of the system dynamics. Under certain circumstances, the total mass of gas in the cylinder may be assumed to be constant. This allows development of a reduced-order system model.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 5

Slope of best-fit line through flow data

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Figure 1

Servopneumatic system

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Figure 2

Valve flow models

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Figure 3

Simulated mass flow rates, from Ref. 21, 254 mm/s command velocity, and 655 kPa supply. (a) Flow versus time and (b) flow versus flow.

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Figure 4

Typical measured mass flow rates, 200 mm/s command velocity, 340 kPa, and rod end up. (a) Flow versus time and (b) flow versus flow.

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Figure 6

Goodness of fit (R2) of best-fit line through flow data

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Figure 7

Mass flow rates under stick-slip, 20 mm/s command velocity, 520 kPa, and rod end up. (a) Position versus time and (b) flow versus flow.

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Figure 8

Simulated mass flow rates under stick-slip, 152 mm/s peak command velocity, and 340 kPa supply. (a) Flow versus time and (b) flow versus flow.

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Figure 9

Mass flow rate ṁ1 to the blind end of the cylinder as a function of the command voltage and cylinder pressure, supply pressure=660 kPa

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