0
Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Dynamic Model and Numerical Simulation for Synchronal Rotary Compressor

[+] Author and Article Information
Hui Zhou

Institute of Compressor, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Chinazhouhui1125@gmail.com

Zongchang Qu, Hua Yang, Bingfeng Yu

Institute of Compressor, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China

J. Fluids Eng 131(4), 041102 (Mar 06, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3089534 History: Received October 24, 2007; Revised January 09, 2009; Published March 06, 2009

The synchronal rotary compressor (SRC) has been developed to resolve high friction and severe wear that usually occur in conventional rotary compressors due to the high relative velocity between the key tribo-pairs. In this study, the working principle and structural characteristics of the SRC are presented first. Then, the kinematic and force models are established for the key components—cylinder, sliding vane, and rotor. The velocity, acceleration, and force equations with shaft rotation angle are derived for each component. Based on the established models, numerical simulations are performed for a SRC prototype. Moreover, experiments are conducted to verify the established models. The simulated results show that the average relative velocity between the rotor and the cylinder of the present compressor decreases by 80–82% compared with that of the conventional rotary compressors with the same size and operating parameters. Moreover, the average relative velocity between the sliding contact tribo-pairs of the SRC decreases by 93–94.3% compared with that of the conventional rotary compressors. In addition, the simulated results show that the stresses on the sliding vane are greater than those on the other components. The experimental results indicate that the wear of the side surface of the sliding vane is more severe than that of the other components. Therefore, special treatments are needed for the sliding vane in order to improve its reliability. These findings confirm that the new SRC has lower frictional losses and higher mechanical efficiency for its advanced structure and working principle.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Wear of the sliding vane

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Comparison between simulated and measured results

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Forces acting on the rotor

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Results of forces on the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Results of forces on the vane

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Cross-section diagram of a synchronal rotary compressor

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Velocity triangle of the sliding vane

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Velocity triangle of the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Results of forces on the rotor

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Comparison of average relative velocity between the rotor and the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Comparison of average relative velocity between the sliding contact tribo-pairs

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Forces acting on the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Forces acting on the sliding vane

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In