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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Pressure Drop in Rectangular Microchannels as Compared With Theory Based on Arbitrary Cross Section

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohsen Akbari1

Mechatronic System Engineering, School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC, V3T 0A3, Canadamaa59@sfu.ca

David Sinton

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 2Y2, Canada

Majid Bahrami

Mechatronic System Engineering, School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC, V3T 0A3, Canada

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 131(4), 041202 (Mar 06, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3077143 History: Received June 11, 2008; Revised December 05, 2008; Published March 06, 2009

Pressure driven liquid flow through rectangular cross-section microchannels is investigated experimentally. Polydimethylsiloxane microchannels are fabricated using soft lithography. Pressure drop data are used to characterize the friction factor over a range of aspect ratios from 0.13 to 0.76 and Reynolds number from 1 to 35 with distilled water as working fluid. Results are compared with the general model developed to predict the fully developed pressure drop in arbitrary cross-section microchannels. Using available theories, effects of different losses, such as developing region, minor flow contraction and expansion, and streaming potential on the measured pressure drop, are investigated. Experimental results compare well with the theory based on the presure drop in channels of arbitrary cross section.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the soft lithography technique

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Figure 2

Schematic of the test section

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Figure 3

Channel pressure drop as a function of flow rate. Lines show the theoretical prediction of pressure drop using Eq. 3 and symbols show the experimental data.

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Figure 4

Variation in friction factor with Reynolds number for sample no. PPR-0.13

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Figure 5

Variation in friction factor with Reynolds number for sample no. PPR-0.76

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Figure 6

Variation in Poiseuille number, f ReA, with Reynolds number

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Figure 7

Comparison of experimental data of present work with analytical model of Bahrami (1)

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Figure 8

Variation in Poiseuille number, f ReA, with Reynolds number

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Figure 9

Comparison between experimental data of present study and previous works

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