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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Vorticity Dynamics in Axial Compressor Flow Diagnosis and Design—Part II: Methodology and Application of Boundary Vorticity Flux

[+] Author and Article Information
Qiushi Li, Hong Wu, Ming Guo

National Key Laboratory on Aero-Engines, School of Jet Propulsion, Beihang University, Beijing 100083, China

Jie-Zhi Wu

State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China; University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahoma, TN 37388

J. Fluids Eng 132(1), 011102 (Dec 18, 2009) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000650 History: Received October 08, 2008; Revised October 30, 2009; Published December 18, 2009

In a companion paper (2008, “Vorticity Dynamics in Axial Compressor Flow Diagnosis and Design,” ASME J. Fluids Eng., 130, p. 041102), a study has been made on the critical role of circumferential vorticity (CV) in the performance of axial compressor in through-flow design (TFD). It has been shown there that to enhance the pressure ratio, the positive and negative CV peaks should be pushed to the casing and hub, respectively. This criterion has led to an optimal TFD that indeed improves the pressure ratio and efficiency. The CV also has great impact on the stall margin as it reflects the end wall blockage, especially at the tip region of the compressor. While that work was based on inviscid and axisymmetric theory, in this paper, we move on to the diagnosis and optimal design of fully three-dimensional (3D) viscous flow in axial compressors, focusing on the boundary vorticity flux (BVF), which captures the highly localized peaks of pressure gradient on the surface of the compressor blade, and thereby signifies the boundary layer separation and dominates the work rate done to the fluid by the compressor. For the 2D cascade flow we show that the BVF is directly related to the blade geometry. BVF-based 2D and 3D optimal blade design methodologies are developed to control the velocity diffusion, of which the results are confirmed by Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes simulations to more significantly improve the compressor performance than that of CV-based TFD. The methodology enriches the current aerodynamic design system of compressors.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Sketch of the profiles of (a) velocity and (b) vorticity, and (c) the BVF variation for a flat-plate flow in a pressure gradient changing from favorable to adverse (5)

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Figure 2

Three-dimensional boundary layer separation and separated flow from a prolate spheroid at incidence (6): (a) flow pattern, and (b) skin-friction (red, mainly upward) and BVF-lines (blue, mainly to the right) on the spheroid surface. SL1 and SL2 are the primary and secondary separation lines, respectively

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Figure 3

Control volume of the flow in the 2D compressor cascade

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Figure 4

Partial part of the fluid in the 2D compressor cascade field

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Figure 5

BVF and curvature of the baseline

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Figure 6

Curvature comparison

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Figure 8

Pressure coefficient comparison

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Figure 9

Mach number distribution

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Figure 10

Comparison of the wall vorticity

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Figure 11

Loss coefficient

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Figure 12

Distribution of pressure and BVF on the suction surface of the rotor blade: (a) pressure and (b) BVF

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Figure 13

Distribution of pressure and BVF on the pressure surface of the rotor blade: (a) pressure and (b) BVF

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Figure 14

(τ,ω) on pressure side (red curve is τ, to the right; black curve is ω, upward)

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Figure 15

(τ,σp) on pressure side (red curve is τ, to the right; black curve is σp, mainly downward)

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Figure 16

(τ,ω) on suction side (red curve is τ, mainly to the right; black curve is ω, mainly downward)

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Figure 17

(τ,σp) on suction side (red curve is τ, mainly to the right; black curve is σp, mainly upward)

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Figure 18

Streamlines out of the suction side

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Figure 19

Zoom in the left window

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Figure 20

Axial BVF distribution on the suction side of the (a) original and (b) optimized rotors

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Figure 21

Comparison of relative Mach number contours at 50% span: (a) original and (b) optimized

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Figure 22

Comparison of relative Mach number contours at 90% span: (a) original and (b) optimized

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Figure 23

Characteristics comparison: (a) pressure ratio and (b) efficiency

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Figure 24

Comparison of total pressure ratio and adiabatic efficiency at the rotor exit: (a) pressure ratio and (b) efficiency distributions

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Figure 25

Circumferential vorticity at the rotor exit

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Figure 26

BVF distribution on the (a) pressure and (b) suction sides of the rotor at low flow coefficient

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Figure 27

Static pressure on the suction side

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Figure 28

Shape of the rotor of the improved design

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Figure 29

Circumferential vorticity at the exit of the new rotor

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Figure 30

Distribution of BVF on the (b) pressure and (b) suction sides of the swept-forward rotor

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Figure 31

Characteristics comparison of the new and original designs: (a) pressure ratio and (b) efficiency

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