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Technical Briefs

Single Phase Compressible Steady Flow in Pipes

[+] Author and Article Information
David Hullender

 University of Texas Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019hullender@uta.edu

Robert Woods

 University of Texas Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019woods@uta.edu

Yi-Wei Huang

 University of Texas Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019yiwei0416@hotmail.com

J. Fluids Eng 132(1), 014502 (Jan 12, 2010) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000742 History: Received November 03, 2009; Revised November 23, 2009; Published January 12, 2010; Online January 12, 2010

In general, the computation of single phase subsonic mass velocity of gas flowing through a pipe requires a computerized iterative analysis. The equations for the friction factor for laminar and turbulent flow are used to obtain explicit equations for the subsonic mass velocity as a function of the pressures at the ends of a pipe. Explicit equations for mass velocity are presented. Included within the equations is a heat transfer ratio, which can vary between 0 for adiabatic flow conditions to 1 for isothermal flow conditions. The use of this heat transfer ratio also enables the formulation of an explicit equation for the gas temperature along the pipe for nonisothermal flow conditions. The explicit equations eliminate the need for an iterative solution. Laboratory data are used to support the accuracy of the model.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Decrease in the downstream temperature as a function of heat transfer ratio r

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Mass velocity for isothermal and adiabatic flow

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Pipe and force balance on the fluid in a small section of the pipe

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