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The Drag Coefficient and the Shape for a Single Bubble Rising in Non-Newtonian Fluids

[+] Author and Article Information
Shaobai Li, Shaokun Jiang, Taotao Fu, Chunying Zhu

State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology,  Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China

Youguang Ma1

State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology,  Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, Chinaygma@tju.edu.cn

Huai Z. Li

Laboratory of Reactions and Process Engineering, Nancy-Université, CNRS, 1, rue. Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 Nancy cedex, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 134(8), 084501 (Jul 27, 2012) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007073 History: Received February 24, 2011; Revised February 29, 2012; Published July 27, 2012; Online July 27, 2012

The dynamical characteristic of a single bubble rising in non-Newtonian fluid was investigated experimentally. The bubble aspect ratio and rising velocity were measured by high speed camera. The shape regimes for bubbles in non-Newtonian fluids was plotted by means of Reynolds number Re, Eötvös number Eo and Morton number Mo. The effects of bubble shape and liquid rheological property on the total bubble drag coefficient were studied. A new empirical drag coefficient correlation covering spherical bubble and deformed bubble was proposed, the predicted results shows good conformity to experimental values over a wide range of 0.05 < Re < 300.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Sketch of the experimental apparatuses. (1- computer; 2- high speed camera; 3- light diffuser; 4- background light; 5- bubble column 6-vavel; 7-rotameter; 8-nitrogen cylinder).

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Figure 2

Representative photographs of bubble shape in 1.0% CMC solutions

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Figure 3

Shape regimes for bubble in CMC aqueous solutions

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Figure 4

Relationship between the drag coefficient and the Reynolds number

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Figure 5

Correlation of drag coefficient against Reynolds numbers

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