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Technical Briefs

Design and Experimental Validation of a Ducted Counter-Rotating Axial-Flow Fans System

[+] Author and Article Information
H. Nouri, F. Bakir, C. Sarraf, R. Rey

Arts et Metiers ParisTech, DynFluid Lab, 151 Boulevard de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France

F. Ravelet

Arts et Metiers ParisTech, DynFluid Lab, 151 Boulevard de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris, Franceflorent.ravelet@ensam.eu

J. Fluids Eng 134(10), 104504 (Sep 28, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007591 History: Received March 22, 2012; Revised August 28, 2012; Published September 27, 2012; Online September 28, 2012

An experimental study on the design of counter-rotating axial-flow fans was carried out. The fans were designed using an inverse method. In particular, the system is designed to have a pure axial discharge flow. The counter-rotating fans operate in a ducted-flow configuration and the overall performances are measured in a normalized test bench. The rotation rate of each fan is independently controlled. The relative axial spacing between fans can vary from 17% to 310%. The results show that the efficiency is strongly increased compared to a conventional rotor or to a rotor-stator stage. The effects of varying the rotation rates ratio on the overall performances are studied and show that the system has a very flexible use, with a large patch of high efficient operating points in the parameter space. The increase of axial spacing causes only a small decrease of the efficiency.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Velocity triangles for the CRS. The fluid is flowing from left to right.

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Figure 2

Top: picture of the front rotor (left) and rear rotor (right). Bottom: experimental facility for CRS,AERO2 FANS.

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Figure 3

FANS characteristics: (a) static pressure rise Δps versus flow rate Q; (b) static efficiency ηs versus flow rate Q. The axial spacing is A = 0.17. □: FR rotating alone at NFR = 2000 rpm (RR has been removed), ★: RR rotating alone at NRR = 1800 rpm (FR has been removed) and ○: CRS at NFR = 2000 rpm and θ = 0.9. The ▪ and the dashed lines stand for the design point of the CRS.

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Figure 4

CRS characteristics at NFR = 2000 rpm, A = 0.17, and θ ∈ [0;1.2]: (a) static pressure rise Δps versus flow rate Q; (b) static efficiency ηs versus flow rate Q. ⊲: θ = 0, ◃: θ = 0.5, ▹: θ = 0.8, ∇: θ = 0.85, ♦: θ = 0.9, Δ: θ = 0.95, *: θ = 1, □: θ = 1.05, ×: θ = 1.1, ○: θ = 1.15, and +: θ = 1.2. The blue ▪ and the dashed lines stand for the design point of the CRS.

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Figure 5

Maximal static efficiency ηs versus θ for the CRS with NFR = 2000 rpm and A = 0.17

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Figure 6

CRS characteristics at various axial spacing (a) static pressure rise Δps versus flow rate Q; (b) static efficiency ηs versus flow rate Q. The rotation ratio of FR is NFR = 2000 rpm and θ = 0.9. ○: A = 0.17, ♦: A = 0.34, ∇: A = 0.69, ★: A = 0.86, □: A = 2.58, and ×: A = 3.10. The blue ▪ and the dashed lines stand for the design point of the CRS.

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