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TECHNICAL PAPERS

The Flow Structure During Onset and Developed States of Rotating Stall Within a Vaned Diffuser of a Centrifugal Pump

[+] Author and Article Information
Manish Sinha, Ali Pinarbasi, Joseph Katz

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218

J. Fluids Eng 123(3), 490-499 (Mar 15, 2001) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1374213 History: Received October 27, 2000; Revised March 15, 2001
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
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References

Emmons,  H. W., Kronauer,  R. E., and Rockett,  J. A., 1959, “A survey of stall propagation–experiment and theory,” ASME J. Basic Eng. 81, pp. 409–416.
Lennemann,  E., and Howard,  J. H. G., 1970, “Unsteady flow phenomena in rotating centrifugal impeller passages,” ASME J. Eng. Power 92, 65–72.
Yoshida, Y., Murakami, Y., Tsurusaki, T., and Tsujimoto, Y., 1991, “Rotating Stalls in Centrifugal Impeller/Vaned Diffuser Systems,” Proc. First ASME/JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference,FED-107 , pp. 125–130.
Ogata, M., and Ichiro A., 1995, “An Experimental Study of Rotating Stall in a Radial Vaned Diffuser,” Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity of Turbomachines, pp. 625–641.
Ribi, B., 1996, “Instability Phenomena in Centrifugal Compressors,” Flow in Radial Turbomachines, Von Karman Institute Lectures series No. 1966-01, R. A. Van den Braembussche, ed.
Tsujimoto, Y., 1996, “Vaneless Diffuser Rotating Stall and Its Control,” Flow in Radial Turbomachines, Von Karman Institute Lecture series No. 1996-01, R. A. Van den Braembussche, ed.
Miyake, Y., and Nagata, T., 1999, “Full Simulation of a Flow in a Single Stage Axial-Rotor in Rotating Stall,” FEDSM-7197, ASME Fluids Eng. Conf., San Francisco.
Tsurusaki, H., and Kinoshita T., 1999, “Flow Control of Rotating Stall in a Radial Vaneless Diffuser,” FEDSM99-7199, ASME Fluids Eng. Conf., San Francisco.
Cao, S., Goulas, A., Wu, Y., Tsukamoto, H., Peng, G., Liu, W., Zhao, L., and Cao, B., 1999, “Three-Dimensional Turbulent Flow in a Centrifugal Pump Impeller Under Design and Off-Design Operating Conditions,” FEDSM-6872 Proceedings of the ASME Fluids Engineering Division, July 18–23, San Francisco.
Longatte F., and Kueny J. L., 1999, “Analysis of Rotor Stator Circuit Interactions in a Centrifugal Pump,” FEDSM-6866, ASME Fluids Eng. Conf., San Francisco.
Sinha,  M. and Katz,  J., 2000, “Quantitative Visualization of the Flow in a Centrifugal Pump with Diffuser Vanes, Part A: On Flow Structure and Turbulence,” ASME J. Fluids Eng. 122, No. 1, pp. 97–107.
Sinha,  M., Katz,  J., and Meneveau,  C., 2000, “Quantitative Visualization of the Flow in a Centrifugal Pump with Diffuser Vanes, Part B: Addressing Passage-Averaged and LES Modeling Issues in Turbomachinery Flows,” ASME J. Fluids Eng. 122, No. 1, pp. 108–116.
Roth,  G., Mascenik,  D. T., and Katz,  J., 1999, “Measurements of the Flow Structure And Turbulence Within A Ship Bow Wave,” Phys. Fluids 11, No. 11, pp. 3512–3523.
Roth G., and Katz J., 1999, “Parallel Truncated Multiplication and Other Methods for Improving the Speed and Accuracy of PIV Calculations,” FEDSM-6998, Proc. ASME Fluids Eng. Conf., San Francisco.
Roth,  G. and Katz,  J., 2000, “Five Techniques for Increasing the Speed and Accuracy of PIV Interrogation,” Meas. Sci. Technol. 12, p. 238–245.
Dong,  R., Chu,  S., and Katz,  J., 1992, “Quantitative Visualization of the Flow Structure within the Volute of a Centrifugal Pump, Part B: Results,” ASME J. Fluids Eng. 114, No. 3, pp 396–403.
Roth G., Hart, D., and Katz J., 1995, “Feasibility of Using the L64720 Video Motion Estimation Processor (MEP) to Increase Efficiency of Velocity Map Generation for Particle Image Velocimetry,” ASME/EALA Sixth Int. Conf. on Laser Anemometry, Hilton Head, South Carolina.
Sridhar,  G., and Katz,  J., 1995, “Lift and Drag Forces on Microscopic Bubbles Entrained by a Vortex,” Phys. Fluids 7, No. 2, pp. 389–399.
Adrian,  R. J., 1991, “Particle-imaging Techniques for Experimental Fluid Mechanics,” Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 23, 261–304.
Japikse,  D., 1998, “Rotating Stall Investigations Expand,” SPIN, 7, pp. 4–5.
Sinha, M., 1999, “Rotor-Stator Interactions, Turbulence Modeling and Rotating Stall in a Centrifugal Pump with Diffuser Vanes,” Ph.D. dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.
Johnston,  J. P., and Dean,  R. C., 1966, “Losses in Vaneless Diffusers of Centrifugal Compressors and Pumps,” ASME J. Eng. Power 88, pp. 49–62.
Iversen,  H. W., Rolling,  R. E., and Carlson,  J. J., 1960, “Volute Pressure Distribution, Radial Forces on the Impeller, and Volute Mixing Losses of a Radial Flow Centrifugal Pump,” ASME J. Eng. Power 82, pp. 136–144.

Figures

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The pump geometry and location of the present measurements
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The optical and control systems
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The performance curve (squares) and output power (triangles) of the pump
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A typical pressure signal of transducer C at: (a) design conditions (φ=0.118), (b) stalled conditions (φ=0.062), (c) power spectra of the signals in 4(a) and 4(b), (d) auto spectrum of Channels A, B, E, and F
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(a) Sample cross spectrum magnitude of transducer signals in vane passages A and B; (b) phase difference between the signals of tranducers A and B
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RMS values of pressure fluctuations as a function of flow rate
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Sample Instantaneous velocity maps at: (a) minimum, (b) zero-crossing (on the rise), and (c) maximum phases of the low-pass-filtered pressure signal at passage C (φ=0.062)
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Phase averaged velocity maps at a minimum pressure phase when the blade is at: (a) −4 deg, (b) 26 deg, and (c) 56 deg. The colors indicate velocity magnitude and a reference vector is provided in Fig. 7. Only alternate vectors are shown for clarity.
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Phase averaged velocitiy maps at a minimum pressure phase when the blade is at: (a) −4 deg, (b) 26 deg, and (c) 56 deg. The colors indicate velocity magnitude and a reference vector is provided in Fig. 7. Only alternate vectors are shown for clarity.
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Sample (a) instantaneous; and (b) phase averaged velocity maps (only alternate vectors are shown in b) at a minimum pressure phase. The flow rate is 3.78 1/s (φ=0.078) and the blade orientation is 6 deg.
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Sample (a) instantaneous and (b) phase averaged velocity maps (only alternate vectors are shown in b) at a minimum pressure phase. The flow rate is 3.28 1/s (φ=0.068) and the blade orientation is 6 deg.
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Sample (a) instantaneous and (b) phase averaged velocity maps (only alternate vectors shown in b) at a minimum pressure phase. The flow rate is 3.08 1/s (φ=0.062) and the blade orientation is 6 deg.
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Sample (a) instantaneous and (b) phase averaged velocity maps (only alternate vectors are shown in b) at a minimum pressure phase. The flow rate is 2.52 1/s (φ=0.052) and the blade orientation is 6 deg.
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Sample instantaneous velocity distribution at a minimum pressure phase as massive flow separation and the onset of stall occur in passage D. The flow rate is 2.89 1/s (φ=0.060) and the blade orientation is 6 deg.

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