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Research Papers: Multiphase Flows

Modeling and Predicting Gas-Solid Fluidized Bed Dynamics to Capture Nonuniform Inlet Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Santhip K. Kanholy, Jillian Chodak, Brian Y. Lattimer

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061

Francine Battaglia1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061fbattaglia@vt.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 134(11), 111303 (Oct 24, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007803 History: Received June 06, 2012; Revised October 03, 2012; Published October 24, 2012

The hydrodynamics of fluidized beds involving gas-solids interactions are very complex, and modeling such a system using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is even more challenging for mixtures composed of nonuniform particle characteristics such as diameter or density. Another issue is the presence of dead-zones, regions of particles that do not fluidize and accumulate at the bottom of the bed, affecting uniform fluidization of the material. The dead zones typically form between the gas jets and depend on the spacing of the distributor holes and gas velocity. Conventionally, in Eulerian–Eulerian modeling for gas-solid mixtures, the solid phase is assumed to behave like a fluid, and the presence of dead zones are not typically captured in a CFD simulation. Instead, the entire bed mass present in an experiment is usually modeled in the simulations assuming complete fluidization of the bed mass. A different modeling approach was presented that accounts for only the fluidizing mass by adjusting the initial mass present in the bed using the measured pressure drop and minimum fluidization velocity from the experiments. In order to demonstrate the fidelity of the new modeling approach, three different bed materials were examined that can be classified as Geldart B particles. Glass beads and ceramic beads of the same mean particle diameter were used, as well as larger-sized ceramic particles. Binary mixture models were also validated for two types of bed mixtures consisting of glass-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic compositions. It was found that adjusting the amount of fluidizing mass in the modeling of fluidized beds best predicted the fluidization dynamics of an experiment for both single phase and binary mixture fluidized beds.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental apparatus

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Figure 3

Pressure drop versus superficial gas velocity for glass particles (dp  = 500–600 μm) comparing experiments with simulations using single solids phase models

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Figure 4

Pressure drop versus superficial gas velocity for ceramic particles (dp  = 500–600 μm) comparing experiments with simulations using single solids phase models

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Figure 5

Pressure drop versus superficial gas velocity for ceramic particles (dp  = 1000–1120 μm) comparing experiments with simulations using single solids phase models

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Figure 6

Pressure drop versus superficial gas velocity for glass-ceramic binary mixture comparing experiments with simulations using the single solids phase model

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Figure 7

Pressure drop versus superficial gas velocity for glass-ceramic binary mixture comparing experiments with simulations using binary mixture models

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Figure 8

Pressure drop versus superficial gas velocity for ceramic-ceramic binary mixture comparing experiments with simulations using binary mixture models

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Figure 2

Pressure drop versus superficial gas velocity for glass particles (dp  = 500–600 μm) comparing experiments with simulations

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