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Technical Briefs

Thermo-Wetting and Friction Reduction Characterization of Microtextured Superhydrophobic Surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Tae Jin Kim, Ravitej Kanapuram, Arnav Chhabra

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712

Carlos Hidrovo1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712hidrovo@mail.utexas.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fluids Eng 134(11), 114501 (Oct 23, 2012) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007604 History: Received March 23, 2012; Revised September 03, 2012; Published October 23, 2012

Microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces have shown potential in friction reduction applications and could be poised to make a significant impact in thermal management applications. The purpose of this paper is to account for the thermal effects of the heated fluid flowing in superhydrophobic microfluidic channels. Through microscopic observation and flow rate measurements it was observed that (1) heating may prolong the Cassie state even under elevated pressure drops by increasing the temperature in the gas layer and that (2) excessive heating may pinch the microchannel flow due to the air layer invading into the liquid layer.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of 60 μm × 500 μm trenched microfluidic channel

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Figure 2

Experimental setup of pressure measurement test

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Figure 3

Micrographs of 60 μm × 500 μm trenched channel under (a) 2500 Pa, (b) 3500 Pa, and (c) 4500 Pa (5×) at 25 °C. Penetration of the water layer into the microcavities can be observed near the inlet.

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Figure 4

Micrographs (near the inlet) of heating effects on liquid penetration at (a) 30 °C and (b) 32 °C. The inlet pressure is at 2400 Pa (gauge).

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Figure 5

Penetration depth versus location under different substrate temperature conditions. The inlet pressure is at 3200 Pa (gauge).

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Figure 6

Micrographs (near the outlet) of heating effects on liquid penetration at (a) 30 °C and (b) 32 °C. The inlet pressure is at 2400 Pa (gauge).

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Figure 7

Flow rate versus temperature graph of 60 μm × 500 μm cavity channels under (a) 800 Pa, (b) 1600 Pa, (c) 2400 Pa, and (d) 3200 Pa inlet pressures

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Figure 8

Flow rate versus ΔP graph of 60 μm × 500 μm cavity channels under different heat substrate temperatures

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