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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow and Heat Transfer in Living Tissues During Thermal Therapy

[+] Author and Article Information
Abdalla Mohamed AlAmiri

Mechanical Engineering Department,
United Arab Emirates University,
P.O. Box 15551,
Al-Ain, UAE
e-mail: alamiri@uaeu.ac.ae

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received August 10, 2012; final manuscript received January 30, 2013; published online March 21, 2013. Assoc. Editor: D. Keith Walters.

J. Fluids Eng 135(4), 041103 (Mar 21, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: FE-12-1383; doi: 10.1115/1.4023658 History: Received August 10, 2012; Revised January 30, 2013

The current numerical investigation tackles the fluid-structure interaction in a blood vessel subjected to a prescribed heating scheme on tumor tissues under thermal therapy. A pulsating incompressible laminar blood flow was employed to examine its impact on the flow and temperature distribution within the blood vessel. In addition, the arterial wall was modeled using the volume-averaged porous media theory. The motion of a continuous and deformable arterial wall can be described by a continuous displacement field resulting from blood pressure acting on the tissue. Moreover, discretization of the transport equations was achieved using a finite element scheme based on the Galerkin method of weighted residuals. The numerical results were validated by comparing them against documented studies in the literature. Three various heating schemes were considered: constant temperature, constant wall flux, and a step-wise heat flux. The first two uniform schemes were found to exhibit large temperature variation within the tumor, which might affect the surrounding healthy tissues. Meanwhile, larger vessels and flexible arterial wall models render higher variation of the temperature within the treated tumor, owing to the enhanced mixing in the vicinity of the bottom wall.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the physical model and coordinate system

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Fig. 6

Comparison of the temperature variation along the bottom surface of the tumor at peak flow condition for different Reynolds numbers

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Fig. 2

Velocity and pressure waveforms employed in the current investigation

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Fig. 3

Comparison of the absolute mid-span displacement of a pipe due to internal fluid flow and gravity against the analytical results of Harris [33]

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Fig. 4

Comparison of the axial velocity profiles between the present results against the analytical and experimental work of Atabek et al. [34]

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Fig. 5

Comparison of the local heat flux distribution along the tumor surface at peak flow condition for different Reynolds numbers (ltumor = 20 mm)

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Fig. 7

Comparison of the local heat flux distribution along the tumor surface at peak flow condition between flexible and rigid wall models using Re=300 (ltumor = 20 mm)

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Fig. 8

Comparison of the temperature variation along the bottom surface of the tumor at peak flow condition between flexible and rigid models using Re=300

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Fig. 9

Uniform and pulsed heating scheme with a time interval of 1.5 s

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Fig. 10

Comparison of the temperature variation along the top and bottom surfaces of the tumor at peak flow condition using different heat flux schemes with Re=300

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Fig. 11

Comparison of the temperature variation along the bottom surface of the tumor at peak flow condition for various elastic modulus of the tumor using constant temperature heating scheme at Re=300

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Fig. 12

Comparison of the temperature variation along the bottom surface of the tumor at peak flow condition for various elastic modulus of the tumor using step-wise heating scheme at Re=300

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