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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Large-Scale Circulation in a Rectangular Enclosure With Periodic Boundary Temperature

[+] Author and Article Information
J. R. Saylor

e-mail: jsaylor@clemson.edu
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Clemson University,
Clemson, SC 29634

John P. McHugh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of New Hampshire,
Durham, NH 03824
e-mail: john.mchugh@unh.edu

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 6, 2011; final manuscript received January 7, 2013; published online April 17, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Mark F. Tachie.

J. Fluids Eng 135(7), 071201 (Apr 17, 2013) (5 pages) Paper No: FE-11-1361; doi: 10.1115/1.4024011 History: Received September 06, 2011; Revised January 07, 2013

An experiment in a rectangular basin of water is used to demonstrate that a large-scale circulation will result from a zero-mean thermal forcing. The thermal force is a spatially periodic pattern of heating and cooling at the top surface, achieved with an interdigitated array of hot and cold tubes. The experimental results show a very robust, steady flow with ascending flows at each end of the tank and a single descending jet near the left wall. These results suggest that small-scale forcing in surface-driven flows may result in significant large-scale subsurface motion.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Basin scale flow observed in the numerical work of Osman et al. [14]. (Reprinted.) The lines are streamlines: solid streamlines indicate clockwise rotation, and dashed streamlines indicate counterclockwise rotation. The solid-fill shading represent contours of the magnitude of velocity normalized by the magnitude of the forcing velocity.

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Fig. 2

Schematic of (a) the experimental setup showing the location of the hot and cold manifolds at the tank ends, and (b) a cross section of the tank showing the pattern of hot and cold tubes. The pattern of lines in (a) connecting the inlet and outlet manifolds represent the tubes shown in (b).

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Fig. 3

Streaklines obtained using the apparatus presented in Fig. 2 for the ΔT = 8K case. Fourier filtering and contrast enhancement was used to better reveal the particles.

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Fig. 4

Streaklines obtained using the apparatus presented in Fig. 2 for the ΔT = 12K case. Fourier filtering and contrast enhancement was used to better reveal the particles.

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Fig. 5

Streaklines obtained using the apparatus presented in Fig. 2 for the ΔT = 16K case. Fourier filtering and contrast enhancement was used to better reveal the particles.

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Fig. 6

Streaklines obtained using the apparatus presented in Fig. 2 for the ΔT = 20K case. Fourier filtering and contrast enhancement was used to better reveal the particles.

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Fig. 7

Streaklines obtained using the apparatus presented in Fig. 2 for the ΔT = 24K case. Fourier filtering and contrast enhancement was used to better reveal the particles.

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Fig. 8

Schematic showing the direction of flow

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Fig. 9

Velocities in the downward and upward jet. Each point is the average of the measurements obtained in the jet at ΔT. The vertical bars are 95% confidence intervals.

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