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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Effect of Finite Diaphragm Rupture Process on Microshock Tube Flows

[+] Author and Article Information
Arun K. R

Gas Dynamics Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Andong National University,
Andong 760749,South Korea
e-mail: kumar@anuis.andong.ac.kr

H. D. Kim

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Andong National University,
Andong 760749,South Korea
e-mail: kimhd@andong.ac.kr

T. Setoguchi

Professor
Department of Ocean Energy,
Saga University,
Saga 8408502,Japan
e-mail: setoguci@me.saga-u.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received July 8, 2012; final manuscript received March 13, 2013; published online June 5, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Prof. Ali Beskok.

J. Fluids Eng 135(8), 081203 (Jun 05, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: FE-12-1319; doi: 10.1115/1.4024196 History: Received July 08, 2012; Revised March 13, 2013

The study of flow physics in microshock tubes is of growing importance with the recent development of microscale technology. The flow characteristics in a microshock tube is considerably different from that of the conventional macroshock tube due to the boundary layer effects and high Knudsen number effects. In the present study an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method was employed to simulate the microshock tube flow field with Maxwell's slip velocity and temperature jump boundary conditions, to accommodate the rarefaction effects. The effects of finite diaphragm rupture process and partial diaphragm rupture on the flow field and the wave propagations were investigated, in detail. The results show that the shock propagation distance attenuates rapidly for a microshock tube compared to a macroshock tube. For microshock tubes, the contact surface comes closer to the shock front compared to the analytical macroshock tube case. Due to the finite diaphragm rupture process the moving shock front will be generated after a certain distance ahead of the diaphragm and get attenuated rapidly as it propagates compared to the sudden rupture case. The shock-contact distance reduces considerably for the finite diaphragm rupture case compared to the sudden diaphragm rupture process. A partially burst diaphragm within a microshock tube initiates a supersonic flow in the vicinity of the diaphragm similar to that of a supersonic nozzle flow. The supersonic flow expansion leads to the formation of oblique shock cells ahead of the diaphragm and significantly attenuates the moving shock propagation speed.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup [18]

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Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of computational domain

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Fig. 3

Static temperature distributions along center line at t = 10 μs on different grids

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Fig. 4

Static pressure distributions along center line at t = 10 μs on different grids

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Fig. 5

Static temperature and axial velocity distributions for slip (case-b) and no slip (case-c) at t = 20 μs

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Fig. 6

Shock position comparisons for micro- and macroshock tube at various times

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Fig. 7

Shock-contact distance comparisons for micro- and macroshock tube at various times

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Fig. 8

Diaphragm opening radius variations with respect to time for different opening functions

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Fig. 9

Static pressure comparisons in the driver section for different diaphragm opening cases at X/D = −2.29 from the diaphragm

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Fig. 10

Static temperature distributions in the driven section at different diaphragm opening stages

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Fig. 11

Static pressure distributions in the driven section at different diaphragm opening stages

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Fig. 12

Density distributions in the driven section at different diaphragm opening stages

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Fig. 13

Mach number distributions in the driven section at different diaphragm opening stages

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Fig. 14

Static temperature ratio distributions across the shock front for parabolic diaphragm rupture process at various times

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Fig. 15

Shock strength variations for sudden and gradual diaphragm rupture process at various times

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Fig. 16

x-t diagram comparisons for sudden and gradual diaphragm rupture process

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Fig. 17

Shock-contact distance variations for sudden and gradual diaphragm rupture process

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Fig. 18

Static temperature and Mach number distributions for a partially ruptured diaphragm flow at t = 10 μs

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Fig. 19

Static temperature distribution along the axial length for partially ruptured diaphragm at t = 50 μs

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Fig. 20

x-t diagram comparisons for fully ruptured and partially ruptured diaphragm conditions

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