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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Lift-Off Behavior of Micro and Nanoparticles in Contact With a Flat Surface

[+] Author and Article Information
Julio L. Rivera

Department of Mechanical Engineering–Engineering Mechanics,
Michigan Technological University,
Houghton 49931, MI
e-mail: jlrivera@mtu.edu

John W. Sutherland

Division of Environmental and Ecological Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette 47907, Indiana
e-mail: jwsuther@purdue.edu

Jeffrey S. Allen

Department of Mechanical Engineering–Engineering Mechanics,
Michigan Technological University,
Houghton 49931, MI
e-mail: jstallen@mtu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Fluids Engineering. Manuscript received July 23, 2012; final manuscript received May 12, 2013; published online August 7, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Prashanta Dutta.

J. Fluids Eng 135(10), 101205 (Aug 07, 2013) (6 pages) Paper No: FE-12-1341; doi: 10.1115/1.4024563 History: Received July 23, 2012; Revised May 12, 2013

The suspension of small particles from flat surfaces is recognized as a source of pollution and a potential hazard to exposed humans. The interaction of air flow over a particle in contact with a flat surface was studied. Parameters that affect the air flow-particle-surface interaction were taken into consideration and conditions that would lead to particle lift-off were identified. The results showed that particles 100 nm in size will lift-off from the surface for separation distances greater than 20 nm. A mapping strategy is proposed that could be used to minimize the suspension of small particles if the particle size and separation distances are known.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Illustration of particle behavior during four stages: (a) stationary isolated particle, (b) particle exposed to air flow with no motion, (c) rolling particle due to air flow effects, and (d) particle lift-off

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Fig. 2

Forces acting on a rolling particle

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Fig. 3

Forces versus time. Here, d = 5 μm, D = 0.4 nm, and Ula = 56.7 m/s

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Fig. 4

Normal force versus time. Here, d = 5 μm, D = 0.4 nm, and Ula = 56.7 m/s

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Fig. 5

Particle diameter versus lift-off air velocity for different values of D

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Fig. 6

Developed turbulent boundary layer velocity gradient

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Fig. 7

Ratio lift to adhesion forces versus the Reynolds number for d = 1 μm for different values of the separation distance D (shown in nm) with X = 1.0 m

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Fig. 8

Air stream velocity for lift-off versus separation distance. Region 1 shows the mapping area for d = 5 μm and Region 2 for d = 1 μm for 5 × 105 < Rex < 107.

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