0
Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Symmetrical Ball Check-Valve Based Rotation-Sensitive Pump

[+] Author and Article Information
Cyro Ketzer Saul

e-mail: cyro@fisica.ufpr.br
Laboratório de Inovação em Tecnologia de Sensores (LITS),
Departamento de Física,
Universidade Federal do Paraná,
Curitiba, Brasil

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Fluids Engineering. Manuscript received August 13, 2012; final manuscript received May 10, 2013; published online August 7, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Prashanta Dutta.

J. Fluids Eng 135(11), 111101 (Aug 07, 2013) (9 pages) Paper No: FE-12-1387; doi: 10.1115/1.4024561 History: Received August 13, 2012; Revised May 10, 2013

In this work an electromagnetically actuated membrane pump, which allows flow reversion with a simple rotation of its valve system, is presented as a proof of concept. The valve system combines two symmetrical ball check-valves (SBCV), fabricated using laser machining techniques on PMMA (poly-methyl methacrylate) and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane). The best efficiencies were achieved using glass balls within the SBCVs. This configuration provides flow rates from 0.2 to 6.0 ml/min with pressures up to 7 kPa. We also present a model which allows simulating the pumping behavior qualitatively, including the reversion after the rotation. The main advantages of the presented pump are wide range flow rates, low driving voltage (below 30 V), same pressure and flow rate in both direct and reverse pumping modes, and easily scalable to both bigger and smaller dimensions.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Schematic of the valve subsystem showing both exploded and assembled views as well as a detailed view of the valves indicating the chamber diameter (A), the input/output orifices diameter (B), and the valve chamber length (C)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic of the electromagnetic actuator in both exploded and assembled views

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of pump behavior using balls denser than the fluid. For position 1: (a) depicts the initial position, (b) depicts the suction semicycle, and (c) depicts pumping semicycle. For position 1 the fluid enters through the bright blue tubing and exits through the dark blue tubing. For position 2, after the system is turned up-side-down, (d) depicts the initial position, (e) depicts the suction semicycle, and (f) the pumping semicycle. For position 2 the fluid enters through the dark blue tubing and exits through the bright blue tubing. The gravitational reference points downwards for all drawings.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic view of (a) asymmetrical and (b) symmetrical check-valves in different positions with respect to the flow input. The respective input and output pressure signals are presented for each valve position.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Experimental setup for both maximum pumping pressure and maximum flow rate measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Maximum pressure as a function of the driving voltage for different chamber diameters and a constant driving frequency of 20 Hz. All lines are only guides to the eye. Error bars are smaller or have the same symbol size.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Maximum pressure as a function of the driving frequency for different chamber diameters and a constant driving voltage of 30 V. All lines are only guides to the eye. Error bars are smaller or have the same symbol size.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Flow rate measurements as a function of the driving voltage for different chamber diameters and a constant driving frequency of 20 Hz. All lines are only a guide to the eye. Error bars are smaller or have the same symbol size.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Flow rate measurements as a function of the driving frequency for different chamber diameters and a constant driving voltage of 30 V. All lines are only a guide to the eye. Error bars are smaller or have the same symbol size.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Characteristic curves of the pumping system as a function of the driving voltage, for a constant frequency of 15 Hz, and a 2.5 mm chamber diameter. The lines are just a guide to the eye. Error bars are smaller or have the same symbol size.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Simulation results using a driving pressure of 6 kPa amplitude and 20 Hz, a time step of 50 ms, 2.0 mm glass balls in a 2.5 mm diameter chamber. (a) The pressure signal and the flow generated in channels A and B. (b) The vertical position of each ball within the chamber. (c) The both column heights as well as column height difference (Δh).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Simulation results using the same parameters as the previous one. This simulation illustrates the flow reversion due to a valve system rotation, i.e., going from position 1 to position 2. (a) The pressure signal and the flows generated in channels A and B. (b) Both column heights as well as the column height difference (Δh). After 1.5 s, which corresponds to the rotation, there is a clear behavior change with the respective flow reversion.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In