0
Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Mitigation of Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Pivoted Circular Cylinder Using an Adaptive Pendulum Tuned-Mass Damper

[+] Author and Article Information
Sina Kheirkhah

e-mail: skheirkh@uwaterloo.ca

Richard Lourenco

e-mail: rlourenco@uwaterloo.ca

Serhiy Yarusevych

e-mail: syarus@uwaterloo.ca
Department of Mechanical
and Mechatronics Engineering,
University of Waterloo,
200 University Avenue West,
Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada

Sriram Narasimhan

Department of Civil and
Environmental Engineering,
University of Waterloo,
200 University Avenue West,
Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada
e-mail: snarasim@uwaterloo.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 27, 2012; final manuscript received July 17, 2013; published online September 6, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Zhongquan Charlie Zheng.

J. Fluids Eng 135(11), 111106 (Sep 06, 2013) (15 pages) Paper No: FE-12-1157; doi: 10.1115/1.4025059 History: Received March 27, 2012; Revised July 17, 2013

A novel adaptive pendulum tuned-mass damper (TMD) was integrated with a two degree-of-freedom (DOF) cylindrical structure in order to control vortex-induced vibrations of the structure. The natural frequency of the TMD was adjusted autonomously in order to control the vortex-induced vibrations. The experiments were performed at a constant Reynolds number of 2100 and for four reduced velocities, 4.18, 5.44, 6.00, and 6.48. Two TMD damping ratios, 0 and 0.24, were investigated for a constant TMD mass ratio of 0.087. The results demonstrate that tuning the natural frequency of the TMD to the natural frequency of the structure decreases the amplitudes of transverse and streamwise vibrations of the structure significantly. Specifically, the transverse amplitudes of vibrations are decreased by a factor of ten and streamwise amplitudes of vibrations are decreased by a factor of three. Depending on the value of the TMD damping ratio, the frequency of transverse vibrations is either characterized by the natural frequency of the structure or by two other fundamental frequencies, one higher and the other lower than the natural frequency of the structure. The results demonstrate that, independent of the TMD damping and tuning frequency ratios, the frequency of streamwise vibrations matches that of the transverse vibrations in the synchronization region, and the cylinder traces elliptic trajectories. A mathematical model is proposed to gain insight into the frequency response of the structure and fluid-structure interactions. The model shows that, for low TMD damping ratios, the frequency response of the structure equipped with the TMD is characterized by two fundamental frequencies; whereas, for relatively high TMD damping ratios, the frequency response of the structure is characterized by a single frequency, i.e., the natural frequency. In both cases, the fluid forcing within the synchronization region is linked to the fundamental frequency/frequencies of the structure. Thus, the classical definition of synchronization applies to multiple DOF structures undergoing vortex-induced vibrations.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Parkinson, G. V., 1971, “Wind-Induced Instability of Structures,” Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A, 269, pp. 395–409. [CrossRef]
Skop, R. A., and Griffin, O. M., 1973, “A Model for the Vortex-Excited Resonant Response of Bluff Cylinders,” J. Sound Vib., 27, pp. 225–233. [CrossRef]
Feng, C. C., 1968, “The Measurement of Vortex-Induced Effects in Flow Past Stationary and Oscillating Circular and D-Section Cylinders,” M.S. thesis, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Khalak, A., and Williamson, C. H. K., 1999, “Motions, Forces and Mode Transitions in Vortex-Induced Vibrations at Low Mass-Damping,” J. Fluid. Struct., 13, pp. 813–851. [CrossRef]
Govardhan, R., and Williamson, C. H. K., 2000, “Modes of Vortex Formation and Frequency Response for a Freely-Vibrating Cylinder,” J. Fluid Mech., 420, pp. 85–130. [CrossRef]
Sarpkaya, T., 2004, “A Critical Review of the Intrinsic Nature of Vortex-Induced Vibrations,” J. Fluid. Struct., 19, pp. 389–447. [CrossRef]
Sarpkaya, T., 1995, “Hydrodynamic Damping, Flow-Induced Oscillations, and Biharmonic Response,” ASME J. Offshore Mech. Arctic Eng., 117, pp. 232–238. [CrossRef]
Gharib, M. R., 1999, “Vortex-Induced Vibration, Absence of Lock-In, and Fluid Force Deduction,” Ph.D. thesis, Caltech, Pasadena, CA.
Jeon, D., and Gharib, M., 2001, “On Circular Cylinders Undergoing Two Degrees of Freedom on Vortex-Induced Vibration and at Low Mass and Damping,” J. Fluid Mech., 19, pp. 389–447.
Jauvtis, N., and Williamson, C. H. K., 2004, “The Effect of Two Degrees of Freedom on Vortex-Induced Vibration at Low Mass and Damping,” J. Fluid Mech., 509, pp. 23–62. [CrossRef]
Sanchis, A., Saelevik, G., and Grue, J., 2008, “Two Degrees-of-Freedom Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Spring Mounted Rigid Cylinder With Low Mass Ratio,” J. Fluid. Struct., 24, pp. 907–919. [CrossRef]
Blevins, R. D., and Coughran, C. S., 2009, “Experimental Investigation of Vortex-Induced Vibration in One and Two Dimensions With Variable Mass, Damping, and Reynolds Number,” ASME J. Fluid. Eng., 131, pp. 1–7. [CrossRef]
Vandiver, J. K., Marcollo, H., Swithenbank, S., and Jhingran, V., 2005, “On High Mode Number Vortex-Induced Vibration Field Experiments,” Offshore Technology Conference (OTC-17383), Houston, TX, May 2–5.
Brika, D., and Laneville, A., 1993, “An Experimental Study of the Aeolian Vibrations of a Flexible Circular Cylinder at Different Incidences,” J. Fluid. Struct., 9, pp. 371–391. [CrossRef]
Huera-Huarte, F. J., and Bearman, P. W., 2009, “Wake Structures and Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Long Flexible Cylinder—Part 1: Dynamic Response,” J. Fluid. Struct., 25, pp. 969–990. [CrossRef]
Flemming, F., and Williamson, C. H. K., 2005, “Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Pivoted Cylinder,” J. Fluid Mech., 522, pp. 215–252. [CrossRef]
Leong, C. M., and Wei, T., 2008, “Two-Degree-of-Freedom Vortex-Induced Vibration of a Pivoted Cylinder Below Critical Mass Ratio,” Proc. Roy. Soc. A, 464, pp. 2907–2927. [CrossRef]
Kheirkhah, S., and Yarusevych, S., 2010, “Two-Degree-of-Freedom Flow- Induced Vibrations of a Circular Cylinder With a High Moment of Inertia Ratio,” ASME 3rd Joint U.S.-European Fluids Engineering Summer Meeting (FEDSM-ICNMM2010-30042), Montreal, QC, Canada, August 1–5.
Kheirkhah, S., Yarusevych, S., and Narasimhan, S., 2012, “Orbiting Response in Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Two-Degree-of-Freedom Pivoted Circular Cylinder,” J. Fluid. Struct., 28, pp. 343–358. [CrossRef]
Ishizaki, H., 1968, “Effects of Wind Pressure Fluctuations on Structures,” Proceedings of the International Research Seminar on Wind Effects on Buildings and Structures, Ottawa, Canada, National Research Council of Canada, Division of Building Research, University of Toronto Press, pp. 265–278.
Williamson, C. H. K., and Govardhan, R., 2004, “Vortex-Induced Vibrations,” Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech., 36, pp. 413–455. [CrossRef]
Dailey, J. E., Weidler, J. B., Hanna, S., Zedan, M., and Yeung, J., 1987, “Pile Fatigue Failures. III: Motions in Seas,” ASCE J. Waterway Port Coast. Ocean Eng., 113, pp. 233–250. [CrossRef]
Huse, E., Kleiven, G., and Nielsen, F. G., 1998, “Large Scale Model Testing of Deep Sea Risers,” Offshore Technology Conference (OTC-8701), Houston, TX, May 4–7.
Zdravkovich, M. M., 1981, “Review and Classification of Various Aerodynamic and Hydrodynamic Means for Suppressing Vortex Shedding,” J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn., 7, pp. 145–189. [CrossRef]
Every, M. J., King, R., and Weaver, D. S., 1982, “Vortex-Excited Vibrations of Cylinders and Cables and Their Suppression,” J. Ocean Eng., 2, pp. 135–157.
Modi, V. J., Welt, F., and Seto, M. L., 1995, “Control of Wind-Induced Instabilities Through Application of Nutation Dampers: A Brief Review,” J. Eng. Struct., 17, pp. 626–638. [CrossRef]
Kareem, A., Kijewski, T., and Tamura, Y., 1999, “Mitigation of Motion of Tall Buildings With Specific Examples of Recent Applications,” J. Wind Struct., 2, pp. 201–251. [CrossRef]
Kwok, K. C. S., and Samali, B., 1995, “Performance of Tuned Mass Dampers Under Wind Loads,” J. Eng. Struct., 17, pp. 655–667. [CrossRef]
Tanaka, H., and Mak, C. Y., 1983, “Effect of Tuned Mass Dampers on Wind Induced Response of Tall Buildings,” J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn., 14, pp. 357–368. [CrossRef]
Roffel, A. J., Lourenco, R., Narasimhan, S., and Yarusevych, S., 2011, “Adaptive Compensation for Detuning in Pendulum Tuned Mass Dampers,” J. Struct. Eng., 2, pp. 242–251. [CrossRef]
Lourenco, R., 2011, “Design, Construction and Testing of an Adaptive Pendulum Tuned Mass Damper,” M.S. thesis, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Kheirkhah, S., 2011, “Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Pivoted Circular Cylinder and Their Control Using a Tuned-Mass Damper,” M.S. thesis, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Wardlaw, R. L., Cooper, K. R., Ko, R. G., and Watts, J. A., 1975, “Wind Tunnel and Analytical Investigations Into the Aeroelastic Behavior of Bundled Conductors,” IEEE Trans. Power Apparatus Syst., PAS-94, pp. 642–657. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

(a) Transverse and (b) streamwise amplitudes of vibrations for 1/fr* = 0 (restrained pendulum) and 1/fr* = 1 (pendulum natural frequency tuned to the natural frequency of the structure). The structure damping ratio (ζ) varies between 0.004 and 0.018.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Normalized transverse vibrations for (a) ζTMD = 0.24 and (b) ζTMD = 0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Adaptive pendulum tuned-mass damper attached to the top of the cylinder model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Experimental arrangement: (a) cylinder model mounted in the water flume test section without a PTMD and (b) simplified top view schematics

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematics of (a) tunes-mass damper and (b) pendulum tuned-mass damper

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Normalized amplitudes of vibrations. (•) corresponds to increasing 1/fr* and (□) corresponds to decreasing 1/fr*.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Normalized frequency of transverse vibrations at U* = 6.00 for (a) ζTMD = 0.24 and (b) ζTMD = 0. (•) corresponds to increasing 1/fr* and (□) corresponds to decreasing 1/fr*

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Spectrogram of transverse vibrations at U* = 6.00, ζTMD = 0.24, and 1/fr*=1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Model predictions for frequency of transverse free vibrations of the structure at 1/fr* = 1.1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Spectrograms and spectra of transverse vibrations for increasing values of 1/fr* at U* = 6.00 and ζTMD = 0. The spectrograms pertain to 1/fr* values indicated in the corresponding spectral plots.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Cylinder tip trajectories for U* = 6.00 and ζTMD = 0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Phase angles for ζTMD = 0.24

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Spectrograms and spectra of transverse vibrations for decreasing values of 1/fr*, at U* = 6.00 and ζTMD = 0. The spectrograms pertain to 1/fr* values indicated in the corresponding spectral plots.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Spectra of streamwise and transverse vibrations at U* = 6.00 and 1/fr* = 1.1 for (a) ζTMD = 0.24 and (b) ζTMD = 0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Cylinder tip trajectories for ζTMD = 0.24

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Phase angles for U* = 6.00 and ζTMD = 0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Schematics of the cylindrical structure equipped with the tuned-mass damper

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Model predictions for frequency of transverse free vibrations of the structure for (a) ζTMD = 0.24 and (b) ζTMD = 0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Frequency of transverse and streamwise forced vibrations of the structure at 1/fr* = 0.52, fe,x* = 0.4, and fe,y* = 2.3 for (a,c) ζTMD = 0.24 and (b,d) ζTMD = 0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Model predictions for spectra of (a) transverse vibrations and (b) streamwise vibrations at ζTMD = 0.24

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Model predictions for spectra of (a) transverse and (b) streamwise vibrations for ζTMD = 0 and 1/fr* = 1.1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In