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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Numerical Investigation of Multistaged Tesla Valves

[+] Author and Article Information
S. M. Thompson

Department of Mechanical Engineering &
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems,
Mississippi State University,
Mississippi State, MS 39762
e-mail: thompson@me.msstate.edu

B. J. Paudel, T. Jamal, D. K. Walters

Department of Mechanical Engineering &
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems,
Mississippi State University,
Mississippi State, MS 39762

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 30, 2013; final manuscript received January 27, 2014; published online May 12, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Daniel Maynes.

J. Fluids Eng 136(8), 081102 (May 12, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: FE-13-1581; doi: 10.1115/1.4026620 History: Received September 30, 2013; Revised January 27, 2014

The Tesla valve is a passive-type check valve used for flow control in micro- or minichannel systems for a variety of applications. Although the design and effectiveness of a singular Tesla valve is somewhat well understood, the effects of using multiple, identically shaped Tesla valves in series—forming a multistaged Tesla valve (MSTV)—have not been well documented in the open literature. Therefore, using high-performance computing (HPC) and three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the effectiveness of an MSTV using Tesla valves with preoptimized designs was quantified in terms of diodicity for laminar flow conditions. The number of Tesla valves/stages (up to 20), valve-to-valve distance (up to 3.375 hydraulic diameters), and Reynolds number (up to 200) was varied to determine their effect on MSTV diodicity. Results clearly indicate that the MSTV provides for a significantly higher diodicity than a single Tesla valve and that this difference increases with Reynolds number. Minimizing the distance between adjacent Tesla valves can significantly increase the MSTV diodicity, however, for very low Reynolds number (Re < 50), the MSTV diodicity is almost independent of valve-to-valve distance and number of valves used. In general, more Tesla valves are required to maximize the MSTV diodicity as the Reynolds number increases. Using data-fitting procedures, a correlation for predicting the MSTV diodicity was developed and shown to be in a power-law form. It is further concluded that 3D CFD more accurately simulates the flow within the Tesla valve over a wider range of Reynolds numbers than 2D simulations that are more commonly reported in the literature. This is supported by demonstrating secondary flow patterns in the Tesla valve outlet that become stronger as Reynolds number increases. Plots of the pressure and velocity fields in various MSTVs are provided to fully document the complex physics of the flow field.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

T45-R Tesla valve (depth = 0.1 mm) with extended entrance/exit lengths and pressure measurement locations (a) and (b). All units in millimeters.

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Fig. 2

Fluidic rectifier/multistaged Tesla valve (MSTV) with (a) low-angled configuration [13] and (b) high-angled configuration [14]

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Fig. 1

(a) Tesla valve and (b) forward and reverse flow directions

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Fig. 13

Diodicity versus nondimensional valve-to-valve distance for various number of Tesla valves with Re = 100

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Fig. 14

Diodicity versus number of Tesla valves (N) for various Reynolds numbers (G = 0.675)

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Fig. 4

Diodicity versus number of cells for extended T45-R Tesla valve at Re = 300

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Fig. 5

Diodicity versus Reynolds number for T45-R Tesla valve determined using CFD simulations and experimental data

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Fig. 6

GMF Tesla valve (depth = 1 mm) with extended entrance/exit lengths and pressure measurement locations (a) and (b). All units in millimeters.

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Fig. 7

Mesh utilized for the MSTV (N = 2)

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Fig. 8

Multistaged Tesla valve with (a) N = 8 and G = 0.675; and MSTV with N = 4: (b) G = 0.675 and (c) G = 2.025

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Fig. 9

Diodicity versus Reynolds number for various number of Tesla valve stages (G = 0.675)

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Fig. 10

Percentage enhancement versus Reynolds number for various number of Tesla valve stages (G = 0.675)

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Fig. 11

Static pressure difference versus Reynolds number various number of Tesla valve stages (G = 0.675) during (a) forward flow and (b) reverse flow.

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Fig. 12

Diodicity versus nondimensional valve-to-valve distance for various Reynolds numbers (N = 6).

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Fig. 15

Contours of static pressure (in Pa) in MSTV (N = 2, G = 0.84) for Re = 200 (on XY plane for Z = 0.5 mm) for (a) forward and (b) reverse flow

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Fig. 16

Centerline static pressure versus position along a two-staged MSTV for forward flow with Re = 200, G = 0.84

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Fig. 17

Centerline static pressure versus position along a two-staged MSTV for reverse flow with Re = 200, G = 0.84

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Fig. 18

Velocity magnitude (in m/s) for reverse flow in MSTV (N = 10, G = 0.84) for Re = 25 (on XY plane for Z = 0.5 mm)

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Fig. 19

Velocity magnitude (in m/s) for reverse flow in MSTV (N = 10, G = 0.84) for Re = 200 (on XY plane for Z = 0.5 mm)

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Fig. 20

Z-component of velocity (in m/s) for (a) forward flow and (b) reverse flow in MSTV (N = 2, G = 0.84) for Re = 200 (on XZ plane for Y = 0.49 mm)

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