0
Special Section Articles

A Sharp Interface Direct Forcing Immersed Boundary Approach for Fully Resolved Simulations of Particulate Flows

[+] Author and Article Information
Jianming Yang

IIHR–Hydroscience and Engineering,
University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242
e-mail: jianming-yang@uiowa.edu

Frederick Stern

IIHR–Hydroscience and Engineering,
University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242
e-mail: frederick-stern@uiowa.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received August 30, 2013; final manuscript received December 4, 2013; published online February 28, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Zhongquan Charlie Zheng.

J. Fluids Eng 136(4), 040904 (Feb 28, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: FE-13-1526; doi: 10.1115/1.4026198 History: Received August 30, 2013; Revised December 04, 2013

In recent years, the immersed boundary method has been well received as an effective approach for the fully resolved simulations of particulate flows. Most immersed boundary approaches for numerical studies of particulate flows in the literature were based on various discrete delta functions for information transfer between the Lagrangian elements of an immersed object and the underlying Eulerian grid. These approaches have some inherent limitations that restrict their wider applications. In this paper, a sharp interface direct forcing immersed boundary approach based on the method proposed by Yang and Stern (Yang and Stern, 2012, “A Simple and Efficient Direct Forcing Immersed Boundary Framework for Fluid-Structure Interactions,” J. Comput. Phys., 231(15), pp. 5029–5061) is given for the fully resolved simulations of particulate flows. This method uses a discrete forcing approach and maintains a sharp profile of the fluid-solid interface. It is not limited to low Reynolds number flows and the immersed boundary discretization can be arbitrary or totally eliminated for particles with analytical shapes. In addition, it is not required to calculate the solid volume fraction in low density ratio problems. A strong coupling scheme is employed for the fluid-solid interaction without including the fluid solver in the predictor-corrector iterative loop. The overall algorithm is highly efficient and very attractive for simulating particulate flows with a wide range of density ratios on relatively coarse grids. Several cases are examined and the results are compared with reference data to demonstrate the simplicity and robustness of our method in particulate flow simulations. These cases include settling and buoyant particles and the interaction of two settling particles showing the kissing-drafting-tumbling phenomenon. Systematic verification studies show that our method is of second-order accuracy on very coarse grids and approaches fourth-order accuracy on finer grids.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Local reconstruction at interface points (△) using fluid points (◻) and body forcing at body points (○) for immersed boundary treatment

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Time histories of the vertical position and velocity for a particle of near-unity density ratio settling in a small container. Symbols: experimental data [15]; lines: present simulations.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Flow field at a gap height of H = 0.5D for a particle of near-unity density ratio settling in a small container. Contours show the normalized velocity magnitude |u|/V∞; vectors of uniform length give the direction of the fluid flow.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Systematic study of numerical accuracy for a particle of near-unity density ratio settling in a small container at Re = 31.9

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Time history of the settling velocity of a spherical particle in a quiescent fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Time histories of the settling/rising velocity of a spherical particle in a quiescent fluid with various low density ratios

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Instantaneous vortical structures at several instants for two particles settling in a quiescent fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

(a) Time history of the X coordinate of the particle centroids and (b) the U velocity components of the particles, for two settling spherical particles in a quiescent fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

(a) Time history of the Y coordinate of the particle centroids and (b) the V velocity components of the particles for two settling spherical particles in a quiescent fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Time history of the distance between two particles during the drafting-kissing-tumbling process of two settling spherical particles in a quiescent fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Systematic study of numerical accuracy for the drafting-kissing-tumbling problem

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In