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Special Section Articles

A Eulerian Method for Water Droplet Impingement by Means of an Immersed Boundary Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
Francesco Capizzano

Senior Research Scientist
Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CIRA,
Italian Aerospace Research Center,
Capua (CE) 81043Italy
e-mail: f.capizzano@cira.it

Emiliano Iuliano

Senior Research Scientist
Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CIRA,
Italian Aerospace Research Center,
Capua (CE) 81043Italy
e-mail: e.iuliano@cira.it

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 23, 2013; final manuscript received October 23, 2013; published online February 28, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Elias Balaras.

J. Fluids Eng 136(4), 040906 (Feb 28, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: FE-13-1044; doi: 10.1115/1.4025867 History: Received January 23, 2013; Revised October 23, 2013

The estimation of water droplet impingement is the first step toward a complete ice accretion assessment. Numerical approaches are usually implied to support the experimental testing and to provide fast responses when designing ice protection systems. Basically, two different numerical methodologies can be found in literature: Lagrangian and Eulerian. The present paper describes the design and development of a tool based on a Eulerian equation set solved on Cartesian meshes by using an immersed boundary (IB) technique. The tool aims at computing the evolution of a droplet cloud and the impingement characteristics onto the exposed surfaces of an aircraft. The robustness of the methodology and the accuracy of the approach are discussed. The method is applying to classical two- and three-dimensional test cases for which experimental data are available in literature. The results are compared with both experiments and body-fitted numerical solutions.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Linearly exact interpolation stencil for an x-normal directed face

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Fig. 2

Immersed boundary model: direct BC imposition

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Fig. 3

NACA0012 airfoil: L10 Cartesian mesh in grey scale by the particle-phase volume fraction

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Fig. 4

NACA0012 airfoil: M∞ = 0.33, Re∞ = 5.10×106, and α = 4 deg. Present method on mesh L10 (solid) and mesh L9 (dashed-dotted), body-conforming reference method (dashed).

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Fig. 5

NACA0012 airfoil: M∞ = 0.236, Re∞ = 6.56×106, and α = 14deg. Water collection efficiency. Present method on mesh L10 (solid) and body-conforming reference method (dashed).

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Fig. 6

NACA64A008 tail: α = 0deg

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Fig. 7

NACA64A008 tail: α = 0deg. Section y/b = 0.75. Present method (solid), body-conforming reference method (dashed), and experimental data (symbols).

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Fig. 8

NACA64A008 tail: α = 0deg. Water collection efficiency. Present method (solid) and body-conforming reference method (dashed).

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Fig. 9

NACA64A008 tail: α = 6deg. Water collection efficiency. Present method (solid), body-conforming reference method (dashed), and experimental data (symbols).

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