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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flow Characteristics Near Casing in an Axial Flow Compressor Rotor at Stable and Stall Inception Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Yanhui Wu

School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an, Shanxi 710072, China;
Collaborative Innovation Center
of Advanced Aero-Engine,
Beijing, China
e-mail: wyh@nwpu.edu.cn

Junfeng Wu, Gaoguang Zhang

School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an, Shanxi 710072, China

Wuli Chu

School of Power and Energy,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Shanxi, Xi'an 710072, China;
Collaborative Innovation Center
of Advanced Aero-Engine,
Beijing, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received July 24, 2013; final manuscript received March 10, 2014; published online September 4, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Satoshi Watanabe.

J. Fluids Eng 136(11), 111106 (Sep 04, 2014) (14 pages) Paper No: FE-13-1450; doi: 10.1115/1.4027178 History: Received July 24, 2013; Revised March 10, 2014

Casing instantaneous pressure measurements and full-annulus unsteady simulations were undertaken to analyze flow characteristics near casing at stable and stall inception conditions in an axial flow compressor rotor, and the objective was to establish its linkage with the stall inception process. The measured flow characteristic at near-stall stable operating conditions was the appearance of rotating instability (RI), which attributed to the activity of an unsteady flow with varying frequency. A similar flow characteristic was found in the simulated near-stall stable flow conditions, and detailed analyses of instantaneous flow field indicated the formation and activity of tip secondary vortex could be flow mechanism for the appearance of RI as far as nonuniform tip loading distribution in measurements was concerned. The measured flow characteristic before spike emergence was still the activity of RI. However, it was submerged into flow field accompany by the emergence of spike. The simulated stall inception process was similar to that from measurement, and further analyses of instantaneous flow field established the causal linkage between RI and stall inception process for the test rotor.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

The arrangement of pressure transducers

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Fig. 2

Pressure rise characteristic of the test rotor

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Fig. 1

Cross-sectional diagram of the test rig

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Fig. 4

Computational mesh and the arrangement of numerical probes

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Fig. 5

Spectrum of casing pressure at different axial locations for PE, NS, and NS3

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Fig. 6

Comparison of FFT results at same axial locations for PE, NS, and NS3

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Fig. 7

A zoomed plot of Fig. 6(a)

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Fig. 8

FFT results for all numerical probes arranged in the absolute frame at U2 and U4

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Fig. 9

A comparison of STFT results between experiments and simulations for probe 1

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Fig. 10

The original pressure signals sensed by 7 measured probes

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Fig. 11

Near-tip flow structures at predicted operating point of U4

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Fig. 12

The low-pass filtered signals for probe 4 and probe 1

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Fig. 13

FFT and STFT results for probe 1

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Fig. 14

A zoomed plot of Fig. 13(a)

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Fig. 15

STFT results for probe 1 between t = 293–306 rev

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Fig. 16

The monitoring history of total pressure ratio

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Fig. 17

Monitoring results from eight numerical probes arranged in absolute frame

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Fig. 19

Axial velocity contour on a surface of revolution at blade tip and detailed flow structures in passage 4 and its neighboring passages at instant t1

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Fig. 20

Axial velocity contour on a surface of revolution at blade tip and detailed flow structures in passage 4 and its neighboring passages at instant t2

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Fig. 18

STFT analysis of numerical pressure signals for Pa1 and Pr1

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Fig. 21

Instantaneous casing pressure distributions between t3 and t3 + 2.5 BPT

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Fig. 22

Instantaneous casing pressure distributions of passage 13 between t3 + 3BPT and t3 + 4BPT and their associated near-tip flow structures

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