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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

On the Evolution of Double Shock-Accelerated Elliptic Gas Cylinders

[+] Author and Article Information
Liyong Zou

Laboratory for Shock Wave
and Detonation Physics,
Institute of Fluid Physics,
CAEP,
Mianyang 621900, China
e-mail: liyong.zou@gmail.com

Wenbin Huang

Laboratory for Shock Wave
and Detonation Physics,
Institute of Fluid Physics,
CAEP,
Mianyang 621900, China
e-mail: huangwenbin@caep.ac.cn

Cangli Liu

Laboratory for Shock Wave
and Detonation Physics,
Institute of Fluid Physics,
CAEP,
Mianyang 621900, China
e-mail: cangliliu@sohu.com

Jun Yu

Laboratory for Shock Wave
and Detonation Physics,
Institute of Fluid Physics,
CAEP,
Mianyang 621900, China
e-mail: yujun4110@163.com

Xisheng Luo

Department of Modern Mechanics,
University of Science and Technology of China,
Hefei 230026, China
e-mail: xluo@ustc.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received February 3, 2013; final manuscript received January 2, 2014; published online July 9, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Robin Williams.

J. Fluids Eng 136(9), 091205 (Jul 09, 2014) (5 pages) Paper No: FE-13-1070; doi: 10.1115/1.4026439 History: Received February 03, 2013; Revised January 02, 2014

The evolution of double elliptic heavy-gas (SF6) cylinders impacted by a planar shock wave is studied by high-speed camera diagnostics. The minor axes (b) of the elliptic cross sections are aligned perpendicular to the shock direction. While the cylinder dimensions are fixed, we adjust the center-to-center separation s between the cylinders. The resulting flow morphologies are visualized and the interaction between double cylinders is analyzed. When s/b = 4.0 or 3.0, the two elliptical cylinders roll up into two counter-rotating vortex pairs and their interaction is weak. When s/b decreases to 2.0 or 1.2, due to strong interaction of the two inner vortices, the inner structure completely disappears and the flow morphology evolves into one counter-vortex pair. Compared with the s/b = 2.0 case, larger amount of baroclinic vorticity is produced in the s/b = 1.2 case, and the morphology is similar to the single elliptic cylinder case, with a second vortex phenomenon occurring at later times. As s/b increases, the extent of cylinder-cylinder interaction becomes weaker, and the integral height of double elliptic cylinders grows while the length decreases.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the shock tube, optical diagnostics, and interface generation system. IC: camera for taking the initial picture; DYN: camera for recording dynamic images.

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Fig. 2

Schematic of two elliptic cylinders and the incident shock. The initial spanwise center-to-center spacing, s, ranges from 4.0b to 1.2b. The z-direction is along the paper normal.

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Fig. 3

Photograph of initial cylinders seeded with fog droplets, viewed along the x-direction

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Fig. 4

Weak interaction image sequences: (a) case 1 (s/b = 4.0); (b) case 2 (s/b = 3.0)

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Fig. 5

Strong interaction image sequences: (a) case 3 (s/b = 2.0); (b) case 4 (s/b = 1.2)

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Fig. 6

The vorticity distributions due to the weak interaction of a shock wave with two elliptic gas cylinders: case 1 (s/b = 4.0); case 2 (s/b = 3.0)

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Fig. 7

The vorticity distributions due to the strong interaction of a shock wave with two elliptic gas cylinders: case 3 (s/b = 2.0); case 4 (s/b = 1.2)

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Fig. 8

The integral height h of double elliptic cylinders (experimental errors of the measurement are equal to ±8%)

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Fig. 9

The integral length l of double elliptic cylinders (experimental errors of the measurement are equal to ±8%)

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