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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Turbulent Flow Over a Flat Plate Downstream of a Finite Height Perforated Plate

[+] Author and Article Information
F. Fouladi

Turbulence and Energy Laboratory,
Centre for Engineering Innovation,
University of Windsor,
401 Sunset Avenue,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
e-mail: fouladi @uwindsor.ca

P. Henshaw

Turbulence and Energy Laboratory,
Centre for Engineering Innovation,
University of Windsor,
401 Sunset Avenue,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
e-mail: henshaw@uwindsor.ca

D. S.-K. Ting

Mem. ASME
Turbulence and Energy Laboratory,
Centre for Engineering Innovation,
University of Windsor,
401 Sunset Avenue,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
e-mail: dting@uwindsor.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received April 22, 2014; final manuscript received August 20, 2014; published online September 24, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Mark F. Tachie.

J. Fluids Eng 137(2), 021203 (Sep 24, 2014) (12 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1219; doi: 10.1115/1.4028402 History: Received April 22, 2014; Revised August 20, 2014

An experimental investigation was carried out to study the turbulent flow over a flat plate in a wind tunnel. The turbulence was generated by a plate with diamond-shaped perforations mounted perpendicular to and on the leading edge of the flat plate. Unlike conventional grid turbulence studies, this perforated plate had a finite height, and this height was explored as a key independent parameter. Instantaneous velocity measurements were performed with a 1D hot-wire anemometer to reveal the behavior of the flow a short distance downstream of the perforated plate (X/D = 10–30). Different perforated plate heights (H = 3, 7, 11 cm) and free stream velocities (U = 4.5, 5.5, 6.5 m/s) have been studied.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Flat plate and perforated plate isometric

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Fig. 2

Test section isometric

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Fig. 3

Velocity profiles at H = 11 cm and (a) 4.5 m/s, (b) 5.5 m/s, and (c) 6.5 m/s free stream velocity

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Fig. 4

Dynamic pressure profiles at H = 11 cm: (a) upstream of the grid and (b) downstream of the grid

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Fig. 5

Velocity profiles for different heights of perforated plate, 5.5 m/s free stream velocity and (a) X/D = 10, (b) X/D = 20, and (c) X/D = 30. The circles signify H = 3 cm, the squares H = 7 cm, and the triangles H = 11 cm.

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Fig. 6

Turbulence intensity for H = 11 cm at (a) 4.5 m/s, (b) 5.5 m/s, and (c) 6.5 m/s free stream velocity. The circles signify X/D = 10, the squares X/D = 20, and the triangles X/D = 30.

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Fig. 7

Turbulence intensity for X/D = 20 and different free stream velocities. The circles signify U = 4.5 m/s, the squares U = 5.5 m/s, and the triangles U = 6.5 m/s.

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Fig. 8

Turbulence intensity for different heights of perforated plate, 5.5 m/s free stream velocity and (a) X/D = 10, (b) X/D = 20, and (c) X/D = 30. The circles signify H = 3 cm, the squares H = 7 cm, and the triangles H = 11 cm.

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Fig. 9

Turbulence intensity at different downstream distances, 5.5 m/s free stream velocity and (a) H = 3 cm, (b) H = 7 cm, and (c) H = 11 cm. The circles signify X/D = 10, the squares X/D = 20, and the triangles X/D = 30.

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Fig. 10

Skewness factor for H = 11 cm at (a) 4.5 m/s, (b) 5.5 m/s, and (c) 6.5 m/s free stream velocity. The circles signify X/D = 10, the squares X/D = 20, and the triangles X/D = 30.

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Fig. 11

Velocity fluctuation versus Time for H = 11 cm, U = 4.5 m/s, X/D = 30 and points (a) Y = 10.8 cm, S = 1.28, (b) Y = 15.8 cm, S = −1.95, and (c) Y = 5.2 cm, S = 0

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Fig. 12

Flatness factors for H = 11 cm at (a) 4.5 m/s, (b) 5.5 m/s, and (c) 6.5 m/s free stream velocity. The circles signify X/D = 10, the squares X/D = 20, and the triangles X/D = 30.

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Fig. 13

Autocorrelation coefficient for H = 11 cm, Y = 5.5 cm, and U = 4.5 m/s, solid line (----) signifies X/D = 10, dashed dotted (--- -) X/D = 20, dashed (-- --) X/D = 30, and round dotted (- - - - - ) the parabola fitted curve to the first five points of R(τ) at X/D = 10

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Fig. 14

Taylor microscale for H = 11 cm and U = 5.5 m/s. The circles signify X/D = 10, the squares X/D = 20, and the triangles X/D = 30.

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Fig. 15

Taylor microscale for different perforated plate's height and 5.5 m/s free stream velocity and at (a) X/D = 10, (b) X/D = 20, and (c) X/D = 30. The circles signify H = 3 cm, the squares H = 7 cm, and the triangles H = 11 cm.

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Fig. 16

Integral length scale for H = 11 cm and (a) 4.5 m/s, (b) 5.5 m/s, and (c) 6.5 m/s free stream velocity. The circles signify X/D = 10, the squares X/D = 20, and the triangles X/D = 30.

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Fig. 17

Integral length scale for different perforated plate's height and 6.5 m/s free stream velocity and at (a) X/D = 10, (b) X/D = 20, and (c) X/D = 30. The circles signify H = 3 cm, the squares H = 7 cm, and the triangles H = 11 cm.

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Fig. 18

Integral length scale for H = 11 cm at X/D = 10 and different free stream velocities. The circles signify U = 4.5 m/s, the squares U = 5.5 m/s, and the triangles U = 6.5 m/s.

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