0
Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

The Piezoelectric Valve-Less Pump: Series and Parallel Connections

[+] Author and Article Information
Amos Ullmann

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
Tel-Aviv University,
Ramat-Aviv 69978, Israel
e-mail: ullmann@eng.tau.ac.il

Yehuda Taitel

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
Tel-Aviv University,
Ramat-Aviv 69978, Israel
e-mail: taitel@eng.tau.ac.il

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 30, 2013; final manuscript received September 7, 2014; published online October 8, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Frank C. Visser.

J. Fluids Eng 137(2), 021104 (Oct 08, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: FE-13-1756; doi: 10.1115/1.4028534 History: Received December 30, 2013; Revised September 07, 2014

The piezoelectric valve-less pump is an attractive device to be used as a micropump for low flow rates. In these pumps, the nozzle/diffuser elements that have a preferential flow direction replace conventional valves, to direct the flow from the inlet to the outlet. This work is a study on the performance of such pumps when several of them (up to four) are combined for use in series and/or parallel arrangement. Two basic pumping configurations are considered: (a) pumping of fluid from low pressure to a higher pressure in an open circuit and (b) pumping of fluid in a closed circuit through a flow resistance. The performance analysis procedure developed is simple and quick and allows studying a wide range of operational conditions. Such an analysis is difficult to conduct using elaborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The performance characteristics of the different combinations is reported and critically evaluated.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The single chamber piezoelectric pump

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Transient flow rates at inlet and outlet and average pumping flow rate for linear flow rate pressure-difference relation (Eq. (2)), for CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, ωv0 = 1, and ΔP = 0.15

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Average pumping flow rate—a comparison between the linear (upper line) and the square root (lower line) flow rate pressure-difference relations, for CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Schematic of the various arrangements of the valve-less pumps

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Series connection valve-less pump assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Average pumping flow rate for two valve-less pumps in series (2S, 2S√), CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Series connection of the valve-less pump assembly with resistance

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Average pumping flow rate, two valve-less pumps in series with resistance, (R2S, R2S√) CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Transient flow rate at the outlet and average pumping flow rate for series connection with and without resistance, CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Parallel connection valve-less pump assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Average pumping flow rate, two cells in parallel (2P, 2P√), CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Transient flow rate at the outlet and average pumping flow rate for two valve-less pumps in a parallel arrangement, CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, ωv0 = 1, and ΔP = 0.15

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Parallel connection of valve-less pump assembly with resistance

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Average pumping flow rate, for two valve-less pumps in parallel with resistance (R2P, R2P√), CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Transient flow rate at outlet (and inlet) and average pumping flow rate for two valve-less pumps in parallel with resistance arrangement, CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, ωv0 = 1, and R = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Series connection of two units of two parallel pumps

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Average pumping flow rate versus pressure difference for series connection of two units of two parallel pumps, (2P2S, 2P2S√) (for four different ways of operation), CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Series connection of two units of two parallel pumps with resistance

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Average pumping flow rate versus pressure difference for series connection of two units of two parallel pumps with resistance (R2P2S, R2P2S√), CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Series connection of four valve-less pumps assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Average pumping flow rate versus pressure difference of four pumps in series, two pumps in series and a single pump, operated in the “in phase” mode, CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 22

Parallel connection of four valve-less pumps assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 23

Average pumping flow rate, for four and two pumps in parallel arrangements, compared to the performance of a single pump, CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 24

Average pumping flow rate versus average pressure difference, for four and two pumps in parallel arrangements, compared to the performance of a single pump, CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 25

Comparison of the present method with numerical results [16] for two pump arrangements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 26

Summary of performances, CL = 0.5, CH = 1.0, and ωv0 = 1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In