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Technical Brief

Characterization of the Behavior of Confined Laminar Round Jets

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Tyler Landfried

Department of Mechanical Engineering
and Material Science,
University of Pittsburgh,
Pittsburgh, PA 15261
e-mail: dtl5@pitt.edu

Anirban Jana

Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center,
Carnegie Mellon University,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
e-mail: anirban@psc.edu

Mark Kimber

Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
and Material Science,
University of Pittsburgh,
Pittsburgh, PA 15261
e-mail: mlk53@pitt.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received November 18, 2013; final manuscript received October 14, 2014; published online November 6, 2014. Assoc. Editor: D. Keith Walters.

J. Fluids Eng 137(3), 034501 (Nov 06, 2014) (4 pages) Paper No: FE-13-1677; doi: 10.1115/1.4028834 History: Received November 18, 2013; Revised October 14, 2014

In this work, the Navier–Stokes equations are solved for a laminar, round jet in a large confinement. The flow is characterized as a function of the enclosure-to-jet diameter ratio, in the range 40–100, and the Reynolds numbers at jet inlet in the range 32–65. Results for jet decay and half width suggest that near the jet inlet the flow is identical to a free jet but eventually deviates away from the jet inlet. We develop a set of correlations including the jet centerline velocity and the jet half width, and features of the transition regions in the flow field.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Various confined jets: (a) laterally confined only, no back wall, (b) jet inlet nozzle flush with back wall, and (c) jet inlet nozzle downstream of back wall

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Maps of %GCI for |u| over the computational domain, on which is overlaid the streamlines for the flow field, for ψenc = 80 and Rejet = 31.9

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Centerline decay for ψenc = 80, Rejet = 31.9. Inlayed: U(r)/Ujet versus (r/rjet)(xlin/Djet): *, xRL/Djet: o, and xFD/Djet: +.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Jet half width for ψenc = 80, Rejet = 31.9. Inlayed: U(r)/Ujet versus (r/rjet)(xlin/Djet): *, xRL/Djet: o, and xFD/Djet: +.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Ujet/U0(x) versus x/Djet for various ψenc with Rejet = 31.9 ψenc = 40: –, ψenc = 60: – –, ψenc = 80: ⋯, ψenc = 100: – ⋅ – (xlin/Djet): *, xRL/Djet: o, and xFD/Djet: +

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

r1/2(x)/rjet versus x/Djet for various ψenc with Rejet = 31.9 ψenc = 40: –, ψenc = 60: – –, ψenc = 80: ⋯, ψenc = 100: – ⋅ – (xlin/Djet): *, xRL/Djet: o, and xFD/Djet: +

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