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Research Papers: Multiphase Flows

Study on the Effect of Inlet Fluctuation on Cavitation in a Cone Flow Channel

[+] Author and Article Information
Liu Hai

School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan, Hubei 430074, China

Cao Shuping

Associate Professor
School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan, Hubei 430074, China

Luo Xiaohui

Lecturer
School of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
Huazhong University of Science and Technology,
Wuhan, Hubei 430074, China
e-mail: luoxiaohui0188@163.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received June 30, 2014; final manuscript received November 5, 2014; published online February 2, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Daniel Maynes.

J. Fluids Eng 137(5), 051301 (May 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1339; doi: 10.1115/1.4029080 History: Received June 30, 2014; Revised November 05, 2014; Online February 02, 2015

A mathematical method was conducted to investigate the mechanism of formation of cavitation cloud, while the inlet stream contains a fluctuating flow. Based on the Rayleigh–Plesset equation and the static pressure distribution in a cone flow channel, parameters related to cavitation cloud are estimated, and the collapse pressure of the cavitation cloud is obtained by solving the equation of Mørch’s model. Moreover, the effect of the amplitude and frequency of inlet fluctuation on cavitation is studied. Results revealed that the smaller the amplitude, the smaller the cloud and the lower the collapse pressure. And frequency of fluctuating stream was found to have a relative great effect on frequency of peak pressure but not so significant on peak collapse pressure and size of cloud. It is concluded that limiting the inlet fluctuation reduces the erosion and noise generated by cavitation collapse.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Void fraction of the cloud when the amplitude of the fluctuating inlet flow is Qs = 0, Qs = 10%Qc, and the frequency is f = 20 Hz

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Initial radius of the cloud when the amplitude of the fluctuating inlet flow is Qs = 0, Qs = 10%Qc, and the frequency is f = 20 Hz

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Collapse pressure of the cloud when the amplitude of the fluctuating inlet flow is Qs = 0, Qs = 10%Qc, and the frequency is f = 20 Hz

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Void fraction of the cloud at f = 20 Hz, amplitude of fluctuating inlet flow Qs = 2%Qc, Qs = 5%Qc, Qs = 10%Qc, and Qs = 15%Qc

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Initial radius of the cloud at f = 20 Hz, amplitude of fluctuating inlet flow Qs = 2%Qc, Qs = 5%Qc, Qs = 10%Qc, and Qs = 15%Qc

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Collapse pressure of the cloud at f = 20 Hz, amplitude of fluctuating inlet flow Qs = 2%Qc, Qs = 5%Qc, Qs = 10%Qc, and Qs = 15%Qc

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Void fraction of the cloud at different frequencies f = 20 Hz, f = 100 Hz, and f = 500 Hz and the amplitude of the fluctuating inlet flow Qs = 2%Qc

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Initial radius of the cloud at different frequencies f = 20 Hz, f = 100 Hz, and f = 500 Hz and the amplitude of the fluctuating inlet flow Qs = 2%Qc

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Collapse pressure of the cloud at different frequencies f = 20 Hz, f = 100 Hz, and f = 500 Hz and the amplitude of the fluctuating inlet flow Qs = 2%Qc

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Collapse pressure of the cloud at different frequencies f = 20 Hz, f = 100 Hz, and f = 500 Hz and the amplitude of the fluctuating inlet flow Qs = 10%Qc

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