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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Numerical Simulation of Stirling Engines Using an Unsteady Quasi-One-Dimensional Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
Niklas Andersson

Assistant Professor
Division of Fluid Dynamics,
Department of Applied Mechanics,
Chalmers University of Technology,
Göteborg SE-412 96, Sweden
e-mail: niklas.andersson@chalmers.se

Lars-Erik Eriksson

Professor
Division of Fluid Dynamics,
Department of Applied Mechanics,
Chalmers University of Technology,
Göteborg SE-412 96, Sweden
e-mail: lars-erik.eriksson@chalmers.se

Martin Nilsson

Cleanergy,
Göteborg SE-417 55, Sweden
e-mail: martin.nilsson@cleanergy.com

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received May 21, 2014; final manuscript received December 12, 2014; published online February 2, 2015. Assoc. Editor: John Abraham.

J. Fluids Eng 137(5), 051104 (May 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1264; doi: 10.1115/1.4029396 History: Received May 21, 2014; Revised December 12, 2014; Online February 02, 2015

An existing computer code for solving the quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) flow equations governing unsteady compressible flow in tubes with smoothly varying cross section areas has been adapted to the simulation of the oscillatory flow in Stirling engines for engine design purposes. By utilizing an efficient smoothing algorithm for the area function that preserves the total volume of the tube, it has been possible to achieve a highly accurate and fully conservative numerical scheme. Submodels for wall friction and heat transfer have been added, enabling the simulation of gas heaters, gas coolers, and regenerators. The code has been used for the modeling of an α-type Stirling engine and validated for a range of operating conditions with good results.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic overview of the α-type Stirling engine

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Fig. 2

Tube system fluid velocity distribution for various crank angles

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Fig. 3

Tube system fluid temperature distribution for various crank angles

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Fig. 4

Expansion cylinder pressure (normalized) versus crank angle for operating point P1.3 (Table 1). The dashed line represents measured data and the dashed-dotted lines represent a ±1% deviation from the measured levels. The solid line represents data obtained from SQUID simulation.

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Fig. 5

Cylinder pressure–volume diagram for operating point P1.3 (Table 1). Solid lines represent data from SQUID and dashed lines represent measured data.

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Fig. 6

Expansion cylinder pressure (normalized) versus crank angle for operating point P2.2 (Table 1). The dashed line represents measured data and the dashed-dotted lines represent a ±1% deviation from the measured levels. The solid line represents data obtained from SQUID simulation.

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Fig. 7

Cylinder pressure–volume diagram for operating point P2.2 (Table 1). Solid lines represent data from SQUID and dashed lines represent measured data.

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