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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Analysis and Simulation of an Oil Lubrication Pump for Internal Combustion Engines

[+] Author and Article Information
Emma Frosina

Department of Industrial Engineering,
University of Naples Federico II,
Via Claudio 21,
Naples 80125, Italy
e-mail: emma.frosina@unina.it

Adolfo Senatore

Department of Industrial Engineering,
University of Naples Federico II,
Via Claudio 21,
Naples 80125, Italy
e-mail: adolfo.senatore@unina.it

Dario Buono

Department of Industrial Engineering,
University of Naples Federico II,
Via Claudio 21,
Naples 80125, Italy
e-mail: darbuono@unina.it

Luca Santato

Lombardini s.r.l. Kohler Group,
Via Cav. del Lav. A. Lombardini, 2,
Reggio Emilia 42124, Italy
e-mail: lsantato@lombardini.it

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received February 17, 2014; final manuscript received December 18, 2014; published online February 2, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Edward M. Bennett.

J. Fluids Eng 137(5), 051102 (May 01, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1080; doi: 10.1115/1.4029442 History: Received February 17, 2014; Revised December 18, 2014; Online February 02, 2015

This paper presents a simulation model of an oil-lubrication gerotor pump for internal combustion engines. The model was constructed by using a monodimensional commercial code that accounted for all phenomena that occur during the revolution of the pump shaft. Several geometric considerations and theoretical observations are presented. An experiment was also performed to validate the simulation model. In these experimental tests, particular attention was paid to the behavior of the pressure oscillations during the pump shaft revolutions. The final aim of this activity is to obtain an instrument that allows the in-depth analysis of the functioning of the pump and lubrication circuit. Additionally, this instrument can be coupled with other models (e.g., variable valve actuation (VVA) and variable valve timing (VVT)) to account for different problems experienced by the hydraulic components of engines.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

2500 cm3 diesel engine for stationary use

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Fig. 2

3D drawing of lubrication circuit

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Fig. 4

Pump areas during a shaft revolution

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Fig. 5

Area variation law versus pump shaft revolution

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Fig. 7

Inlet and outlet area laws

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Fig. 8

Cylinder-piston model

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Fig. 9

Resistive component

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Fig. 10

Hydraulic resistance library submodel

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Fig. 11

Complete pump model

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Fig. 14

P–Q curve at 80 °C

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Fig. 15

Pump test bench layout

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Fig. 16

(a) and (b) Experimental oil pressure behavior

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Fig. 17

Model validation at 2000 rpm

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Fig. 18

Model validation at 3000 rpm

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Fig. 19

Lubrication circuit model

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Fig. 20

Pump model and lubrication circuit model

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Fig. 21

Entire model validation: main gallery

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Fig. 22

Entire model validation: cam-shaft gallery

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Fig. 23

Oil temperature behavior

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Fig. 24

Oil consumption distribution

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Fig. 25

Crankshaft bearing oil consumption

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Fig. 26

Pump displacement reduction

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