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Technical Brief

Flow Simulation of Jet Deviation by Rotating Pelton Buckets Using Finite Volume Particle Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Christian Vessaz

Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines,
EPFL,
Avenue de Cour 33bis,
Lausanne 1007, Switzerland
e-mail: christian.vessaz@epfl.ch

Ebrahim Jahanbakhsh

Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines,
EPFL,
Avenue de Cour 33bis,
Lausanne 1007, Switzerland
e-mail: ebrahim.jahanbakhsh@epfl.ch

François Avellan

Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines,
EPFL,
Avenue de Cour 33bis,
Lausanne 1007, Switzerland
e-mail: francois.avellan@epfl.ch

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received October 17, 2014; final manuscript received February 6, 2015; published online March 26, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Frank C. Visser.

J. Fluids Eng 137(7), 074501 (Jul 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1599; doi: 10.1115/1.4029839 History: Received October 17, 2014; Revised February 06, 2015; Online March 26, 2015

The objective of the present paper is to perform numerical simulations of a high-speed water jet impinging on rotating Pelton buckets using the finite volume particle method (FVPM), which combines attractive features of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and conventional grid-based finite volume. The particles resolution is first validated by a convergence study. Then, the FVPM results are validated with available measurements and volume of fluid (VOF) simulations. It is shown that the pressure field in the buckets inner wall is in good agreement with the experimental and numerical data and the evolution of the flow pattern matches the high-speed visualization.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Rectangular support kernels and overlapping regions (a) plotted with the contour of Sheppard shape function for the particle i and top-hat kernels (b), outline of the intersection volume between particles i and j (c)

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Fig. 2

Outline of the case study: the buckets are defined by a reference diameter D1 and a width B2, they tilt around the Z axis and their angular position is given by θ, the inlet of the water jet has a diameter D2 and its axis is in the X direction at a distance Y=-D1/2

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Fig. 3

Outline of the case study: 30 pressure samples are located on the buckets inner surface and 13 on the outer surface

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Fig. 4

Evolution of the torque for each bucket and total torque in function of the angular position for a spatial discretization of D2/Xref=50

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Fig. 5

Influence of the spatial discretization on the averaged torque for one bucket in function of the angular position

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Fig. 6

FVPM simulation of five rotating buckets: free surface reconstruction of the water sheet using ParaView

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Fig. 7

Time history of Cp at the pressure sensors seven, nine, 14, 17, 19, and 21 on the buckets inner surface for the FVPM result with a spatial discretization D2/Xref=50, VOF result and measurements

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Fig. 8

Time history of Cp at the pressure sensors 31 and 40 on the buckets outer surface for the FVPM result with a spatial discretization D2/Xref=50, VOF result and measurements

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Fig. 9

Wall pressure field on the bucket inner surface for the impinging angles of θ = 62 deg,θ = 72 deg,θ = 87 deg, and θ = 104 deg

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Fig. 10

Comparison of the relative flow pattern inside the buckets between FVPM (right), VOF (middle), and experimental (right) for the impinging angles of θ = 62 deg,θ = 72 deg,θ = 87 deg, and θ = 104 deg

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