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Research Papers: Multiphase Flows

Study on the Air Core Formation of a Gas–Liquid Separator

[+] Author and Article Information
Junlian Yin

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: jlyin@sjtu.edu.cn

Jingjing Li, Yanfei Ma

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: jingjingli@sjtu.edu.cn

Hua Li

Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Shanghai 201800, China
e-mail: 343962098@sjtu.edu.cn

Wei Liu

Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Shanghai 201800, China
e-mail: liuwei@sinap.ac.cn

Dezhong Wang

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: dzwang@sjtu.edu.cn

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received July 19, 2014; final manuscript received March 15, 2015; published online April 29, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Mark R. Duignan.

J. Fluids Eng 137(9), 091301 (Sep 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1388; doi: 10.1115/1.4030198 History: Received July 19, 2014; Revised March 15, 2015; Online April 29, 2015

The gas–liquid separator is a key component in the gas removal system in thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR). In this paper, an experimental study focusing on the gas core formation in the gas–liquid separator was carried out. We observed that formation of the air core depends primarily on the back pressure in the separator. Gas core formation was visualized for a range of back pressures, swirl numbers, and Reynolds numbers. Analysis of flow patterns indicated that gas core formation may be defined as four stages: “air core with suction,” “tadpole-shaped core,” “cloudy core,” and “rod core.” When rod core is achieved, gas bubbles will be separated completely and that particular back pressure is defined as critical back pressure. The critical back pressure depends on swirl number and Reynolds number. The trends how the critical back pressures vary with the Reynolds number and the swirl number were analyzed.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The principle of the fission gas removal subsystem in the TMSR ((1) bubble generation = helium added, (2) mass transfer = helium absorbs Xenon, and (3) gas separation = Fig. 2)

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Fig. 2

The gas–liquid separator design and the swirl and recovery vane used

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Fig. 3

The geometry of the separator

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Fig. 4

The separation process illustrating the traces of bubbles

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Fig. 5

The flow pattern which shows the bubbles and the air core

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Fig. 6

Schematic map of the experimental system

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Fig. 7

Schematic of the parameters used for the definition of swirl number

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Fig. 8

Air core evolution when Re = 35,262 and S = 0.77

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Fig. 10

Air core evolution when Re = 35,262 and S = 1.17

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Fig. 11

Air core evolution when Re = 35,262 and S = 1.42

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Fig. 12

Air core evolution when Re = 35,262 and S = 1.71

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Fig. 9

Air core evolution when Re = 35,262 and S = 0.96

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Fig. 13

Air core evolution when Re = 77,576 and S = 1.17

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Fig. 14

Air core evolution when Re = 119,891 and S = 1.17

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Fig. 15

The critical back pressure variation under different Re and S

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Fig. 16

The critical pressure coefficient variation under different Re and S

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Fig. 17

The LER variation with the pressure coefficient under different Re when S = 0.77

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Fig. 18

The critical values of LERs under different Re and S

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