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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

A Parametric Study of Turbulent Flow Past a Circular Cylinder Using Large Eddy Simulation

[+] Author and Article Information
W. Sidebottom

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Melbourne,
Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
e-mail: wts@student.unimelb.edu.au

A. Ooi

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Melbourne,
Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia

D. Jones

Maritime Division,
Defence Science and Technology Organisation,
Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207, Australia

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 12, 2014; final manuscript received April 10, 2015; published online May 20, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Samuel Paolucci.

J. Fluids Eng 137(9), 091202 (Sep 01, 2015) (13 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1129; doi: 10.1115/1.4030380 History: Received March 12, 2014; Revised April 10, 2015; Online May 20, 2015

Flow over a circular cylinder at a Reynolds number of 3900 is investigated using large eddy simulations (LES) to assess the affect of four numerical parameters on the resulting flow-field. These parameters are subgrid scale (SGS) turbulence models, wall models, discretization of the advective terms in the governing equations, and grid resolution. A finite volume method is employed to solve the incompressible Navier–Stokes equations (NSE) on a structured grid. Results are compared to the experiments of Ong and Wallace (1996, “The Velocity Field of the Turbulent Very Near Wake of a Circular Cylinder,” Exp. Fluids, 20(6), pp. 441–453) and Lourenco and Shih (1993, “Characteristics of the Plane Turbulent Near Wake of a Circular Cylinder: A Particle Image Velocimetry Study,” private communication (taken from Ref. [2]); and the numerical results of Beaudan and Moin (1994, “Numerical Experiments on the Flow Past a Circular Cylinder at Sub-Critical Reynolds Number,” Technical Report No. TF-62), Kravchenko and Moin (2000, “Numerical Studies of Flow Over a Circular Cylinder at ReD = 3900,” Phys. Fluids, 12(2), pp. 403–417), and Breuer (1998, “Numerical and Modelling Influences on Large Eddy Simulations for the Flow Past a Circular Cylinder,” Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 19(5), pp. 512–521). It is concluded that the effect of the SGS models is not significant; results with and without a wall model are inconsistent; nondissipative discretization schemes, such as central finite difference methods, are preferred over dissipative methods, such as upwind finite difference methods; and it is necessary to properly resolve the boundary layer in the vicinity of the cylinder in order to accurately model the complex flow phenomena in the cylinder wake. These conclusions are based on the analysis of bulk flow parameters and the distribution of mean and fluctuating quantities throughout the domain. In general, results show good agreement with the experimental and numerical data used for comparison.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the computational domain (top) and fine mesh (bottom)

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Fig. 2

Pressure coefficient on the cylinder surface: ——, one equation eddy; ---, Smagorinsky; △, experiment of Norberg; and ·-·-, B-spline simulations of Kravchenko and Moin [2] (dynamic Smagorinsky turbulence model)

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Fig. 3

Time mean streamwise velocity on the wake centerline: ——, one equation eddy; ---, Smagorinsky; □, experiment of Lourenco and Shih [12]; ○, experiment of Ong and Wallace [13]; ·-·-, B-spline simulations of Kravchenko and Moin [2] (dynamic Smagorinsky turbulence model); and …, upwind FD simulations of Beaudan and Moin [1]

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Fig. 4

Instantaneous isosurfaces of vorticity magnitude for the Smagorinsky SGS model of (top) case 1 (FCW); (middle) case 3 (FUW); and (bottom) case 5 (MCN). Fourteen contours from ωD/U∞ = 1.8 (black; in blue online) to ωD/U∞ = 10.0 (light/white; in red online) are shown.

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Fig. 5

Contours of vorticity magnitude during a single shedding period (T) for the Smagorinsky SGS model of case 1 (fine, central, and wall model). Contours are shown at intervals of T/8. Sixteen contours from ωD/U∞ = 0.5 (dark) to ωD/U∞ = 10.0 (light) are shown.

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Fig. 6

History of lift and drag coefficients

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Fig. 7

Power spectral density of the drag and lift forces with the Smagorinsky SGS model

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Fig. 8

Mean streamwise velocity at three locations in the very near wake: ——, one equation eddy; ---, Smagorinsky; □, experiment of Lourenco and Shih [12]; and ·-·-, B-spline simulations of Kravchenko and Moin [2]

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Fig. 9

Mean spanwise velocity at three locations in the very near wake: ——, one equation eddy; ---, Smagorinsky; □, experiment of Lourenco and Shih [12]; and ·-·-, B-spline simulations of Kravchenko and Moin [2]

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Fig. 10

Mean streamwise velocity at three locations in the near wake: ——, one equation eddy; ---, Smagorinsky; ○, experiment of Ong and Wallace [13]; and ·-·-, B-spline simulations of Kravchenko and Moin [2]

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Fig. 11

Variance of streamwise velocity fluctuations at three locations in the near wake: ——, one equation eddy; ---, Smagorinsky; ○, experiment of Ong and Wallace [13]; and ·-·-, B-spline simulations of Kravchenko and Moin [2]

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Fig. 12

Reynolds shear stress at three locations in the near wake: ——, one equation eddy; ---, Smagorinsky; ○, experiment of Ong and Wallace [13]; and ·-·-, B-spline simulations of Kravchenko and Moin [2]

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Fig. 13

Skin friction coefficient on the surface of the cylinder: ——, one equation eddy; ---, Smagorinsky; and ·-·-, finite volume simulation of Breuer [17] (Smagorinsky turbulence model)

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Fig. 14

One-dimensional energy spectra at locations (x/D,y/D) = (2,0), (5, 0), and (10, 0) for case 1 (FCW). Arrows indicate direction of increasing x/D. Dashed line shows -5/3 slope for reference.

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