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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Investigation of Supersonic Jet Interaction With Hypersonic Cross Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
S. L. N. Desikan

Experimental Aerodynamics Division,
Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre,
Thiruvananthapuram 695022, India
e-mail: desikan_sln@yahoo.com

R. Saravanan, S. Subramanian

Experimental Aerodynamics Division,
Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre,
Thiruvananthapuram 695022, India

A. E. Sivararamakrishnan

Aerodynamic Characterisation
and Experimental Group,
Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre,
Thiruvananthapuram 695022, India

S. Pandian

Aeronautics Entity,
Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre,
Thiruvananthapuram 695022, India

An equi-angle skew measure of zero indicates a perfect hexahedral and a value of one denotes a degenerate one. In practice, skewness measure values below 0.6 are usually acceptable.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received October 17, 2014; final manuscript received April 9, 2015; published online June 8, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Peter Vorobieff.

J. Fluids Eng 137(10), 101101 (Oct 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1603; doi: 10.1115/1.4030393 History: Received October 17, 2014; Revised April 09, 2015; Online June 08, 2015

This paper presents the interaction of a highly underexpanded supersonic jet of Mjet = 3.19 with hypersonic cross flow (M = 6). The jet interaction flowfield was studied through wall static pressure measurement, Schlieren, and oil flow visualization. The results clearly demonstrate that flow separation is a strong function of jet pressure ratio (PR). To understand the overall flow physics, numerical simulations were also carried out. The flow features such as primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary vortex in separated boundary layer, horseshoe vortices, and its foot print downstream of the injection port were predicted well.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

Flat plate with port locations

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Fig. 4

Nozzle jet without cross flow

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Fig. 5

Schlieren flow visualization over flat plate without nozzle jet

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Fig. 6

Nozzle centerline pressure distribution over the flat plate–freestream alone

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Fig. 7

Schlieren flow visualization: (a) PR-3600, (b) PR-5500, (c) PR-9200, (d) PR-10000, (e) PR-12200, and (f) PR-14300. 1, Nozzle lip shock; 2, leading edge shock; 3, separation shock; 4, shear layer; 5, bow shock; 6, barrel shock; 7, re-attachment shock; and 8, expansion fan.

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Fig. 8

Nondimensionalized pressure distribution over flat plate with nozzle jet

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Fig. 9

Computational domain

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Fig. 10

Grid distribution on the flat plate

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Fig. 11

Grid independent study

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Fig. 12

Flowfield comparison for PR-10,000

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Fig. 13

Flowfield comparison for PR-12,200

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Fig. 14

Streamline pattern around secondary jet

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Fig. 15

Comparison of oil flow visualization for PR-10,000

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Fig. 16

Comparison of separation distance (X/D) from the center of supersonic jet nozzle

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Fig. 17

Comparison of wall static pressure for PR-10,000

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Fig. 18

Comparison of wall static pressure for PR-12,200

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Fig. 19

Boundary layer flow for PR-10,000

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Fig. 20

Boundary layer flow for PR-12,200

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