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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Numerical Investigation of the Spear Valve Configuration on the Performance of Pelton and Turgo Turbine Injectors and Runners

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Benzon, A. Židonis

Engineering Department,
Engineering Building,
Lancaster University Renewable Energy Group
and Fluid Machinery Group,
Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YR, UK

A. Panagiotopoulos, J. S. Anagnostopoulos, D. E. Papantonis

School of Mechanical Engineering,
National Technical University of Athens,
9, Heroon Polytechniou Street,
Zografou, Athens 157 80, Greece

G. A. Aggidis

Engineering Department,
Engineering Building,
Lancaster University Renewable Energy Group
and Fluid Machinery Group,
Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YR, UK
e-mail: g.aggidis@lancaster.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 5, 2014; final manuscript received May 6, 2015; published online June 25, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Edward M. Bennett.

J. Fluids Eng 137(11), 111201 (Nov 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1728; doi: 10.1115/1.4030628 History: Received December 05, 2014; Revised May 06, 2015; Online June 25, 2015

This paper uses two modern commercial cfd software packages to compare the performance of a standard and improved impulse turbine injector developed in a previous study. The two injector designs are compared by simulating the two-dimensional (2D) axis-symmetric cases as well as full three-dimensional (3D) cases including the bend in the branch pipe and the guide vanes. The resulting jet profiles generated by these simulations are used to initialize the inlet conditions for a full Pelton and Turgo runner simulation at different operating conditions in order to assess the impact of the injector design on the performance and efficiency of a real impulse turbine. The results showed that the optimized injector design, with steeper nozzle and spear angles, not only attains higher efficiencies in the 2D and 3D injector simulations but also produces a jet which performs better than the standard design in both the Pelton and the Turgo runner simulations. The results show that the greatest improvement in the hydraulic efficiency occurs within the injector with the improved design, showing an increase in efficiency of 0.76% for the Turgo 3D injector and 0.44% for the Pelton 3D injector. The results also show that in the case of the 3D injector, the improved injector geometry produces a jet profile which induces better overall runner performance, giving a 0.5% increase in total hydraulic efficiency for the Pelton case and 0.7% for the Turgo case.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Typical spear valve injector configuration

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Fig. 2

Spear travel/nozzle diameter (a) against flow rate for 90-50 and 110-70 designs with polynomial fit curves

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Fig. 3

Injector domain geometry using 110-70 nozzle/spear design

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Fig. 4

3D mesh of a complete geometry assembly for the 90-50 nozzle/spear design

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Fig. 5

Magnified view of the mesh at the nozzle exit and spear tip

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Fig. 6

Image of the 3D injector simulation with the reference locations: P—reference plane at the distance of two nozzle opening diameters from the nozzle exit, H—horizontal line for 2D profiles, and V—vertical line for 2D profiles

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Fig. 7

Comparison of 90-50 injector jet axial velocity profiles at a distance of two nozzle diameters from the nozzle exit

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Fig. 8

Comparison of 110-70 injector axial jet velocity profiles at a distance of two nozzle diameters from the nozzle exit

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Fig. 9

Vector plot of secondary velocities in the flow before the spear holding vanes

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Fig. 10

Vector plot of 90-50 injector design secondary velocities in the free jet at a distance of two nozzle opening diameters from the nozzle exit

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Fig. 11

Vector plot of 110-70 injector design secondary velocities in the free jet at a distance of two nozzle opening diameters from the nozzle exit

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Fig. 12

Optimized Turgo runner computer aided design (CAD) design [8]

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Fig. 13

Isosurface at water volume fraction 0.5 for the 3D 110-70 injector jet profile—peak torque timestep

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Fig. 14

Comparison between 90-50 and 110-70 injector performance for the Turgo setup

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Fig. 15

Comparison between 90-50 and 110-70 injector performance for the Turgo setup

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Fig. 16

Comparison of 90-50 injector design jet velocity profiles at a distance of two nozzle diameters from the nozzle exit

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Fig. 17

Optimized Pelton runner installed in the Lab [26]

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Fig. 18

Isosurface at water volume fraction 0.5 for the 3D, 110-70 injector jet profile, colored by velocity in the stationary domain—peak torque timestep (left) and bucket evacuation phase (right)

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Fig. 19

Comparison between 90-50 and 110-70 injector performance for the Pelton setup

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Fig. 20

Comparison between 90-50 and 110-70 runner performance for the Pelton setup

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