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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Effect of Orifice Geometry on the Development of Slightly Heated Turbulent Jets

[+] Author and Article Information
Sehaba Madjid

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,
USTO-MB,
BP 1505 El M'Naouer,
Oran 31000, Algeria
e-mail: majid_shb@hotmail.com

Sabeur Amina

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,
USTO-MB,
BP 1505 El M'Naouer,
Oran 31000, Algeria
e-mail: sabeuramina@hotmail.com

Azemi Benaissa

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Royal Military College of Canada,
Kingston, ON K7K 7B4, Canada
e-mail: benaissa-a@rmc.ca

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received October 22, 2014; final manuscript received May 19, 2015; published online June 26, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Mark F. Tachie.

J. Fluids Eng 137(11), 111202 (Nov 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1610; doi: 10.1115/1.4030677 History: Received October 22, 2014; Revised May 19, 2015; Online June 26, 2015

Passive scalar (temperature) mixing with different orifice geometries is considered at low Reynolds number. The kinetic energy dissipation rate shows that the three jets achieve a self-similar state quickly compared to a nozzle jet. Scalar dissipation evolves faster to the self-preserving state than kinetic energy dissipation and the asymptotic value of the normalized kinetic and scalar dissipation on the jet centerline can be predicted. Taylor and Corrsin microscales start evolving linearly with x/D as early as x/D = 10. Normalized spectra using these length scales continue to evolve for the circular jet and collapse faster for the six-lobe jet, when Rλ reach a constant value. The scaling factor and range for the velocity and the scalar suggest that the scaling region “similar to the inertial range” reaches equilibrium before small scales reach complete equilibrium. The use of multilobe jets promotes the development toward a complete self-preserving state for the scalar field.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Tested geometries: (1) circle, (2) X-lobes, and (3) six-lobes

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Fig. 2

Experimental system

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Fig. 3

Axial evolution of the mean velocity profile

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Fig. 4

Axial evolution of the mean temperature profile

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Fig. 5

Axial evolution of the turbulent intensity Iu′ and the homogeneity factor u'/v'

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Fig. 6

Axial evolution of the temperature turbulent intensity

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Fig. 7

The evolution of the normalized mean kinetic energy dissipation rate

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Fig. 8

The evolution of the normalization of the mean kinetic energy dissipation rate after Mi et al. [21]

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Fig. 9

The evolution of the normalized mean scalar energy dissipation rate

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Fig. 10

Axial evolution of the normalized Taylor and Corrsin microscales

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Fig. 11

Axial evolution of the turbulent Reynolds number and the Pèclet number

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Fig. 12

Comparison of the normalized one-dimensional spectrum of u'2¯ and θ'2¯

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Fig. 13

One-dimensional power spectrum velocity scaling range

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Fig. 14

One-dimensional power spectrum of scalar scaling range

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