0
Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Pipe Flow for Water Hammer

[+] Author and Article Information
Hamid Shamloo

Department of Civil Engineering,
K.N. Toosi University of Technology,
470 Mirdamad Ave. West,
Tehran 19697, Iran
e-mail: hshamloo@kntu.ac.ir

Maryam Mousavifard

Department of Civil Engineering,
470 Mirdamad Ave. West,
Tehran 19697, Iran
e-mail: sm.mousavi@mail.kntu.ac.ir

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received April 3, 2015; final manuscript received May 23, 2015; published online July 17, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Frank C. Visser.

J. Fluids Eng 137(11), 111203 (Nov 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: FE-15-1236; doi: 10.1115/1.4030806 History: Received April 03, 2015; Revised May 23, 2015; Online July 17, 2015

A numerical model of turbulent transient flow is used to study the dynamics of turbulence during different periods of water hammer in a polymeric pipe. The governing equations of the transient flow are solved by using the finite difference (FD) method, and the effects of viscoelasticity are modeled by means of a two-dimensional (2D) Kelvin–Voigt model. The experimental data with the Ghidaoui parameter P in the order of one are chosen in which the generated shear wave propagates toward the center of the pipe, while the pressure wave passes the length of the pipe. By studying the turbulence shear force during different times, it is shown that the turbulence structure changes considerably in the first cycle of water hammer. In the accelerated phases, the dominant feature is the creation of a shear wave near the wall, and in the decelerated phases the dominant feature is the propagation of the shear wave created in the accelerated phase.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Flowchart for solving the equations of motion

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Pressure head traces for test case 1: (a) at the valve and (b) at 180 m downstream of the reservoir

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Pressure head traces for test case 2: (a) at the valve and (b) at 180 m downstream of the reservoir

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Velocity profiles at a distance of 180 m downstream of the reservoir in test case 2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Turbulent kinetic energy profiles during the first cycle of test case 2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Eddy viscosity profiles during the first cycle of test case 2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Turbulent shear stress profiles during the first cycle of test case 2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Grid independence check for eddy viscosity at t = 0.5L/a

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Comparison of momentum equation terms except the pressure force term for test case 2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Turbulent shear force along the pipe radius during different times of the first cycle of test case 2

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In