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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Inflow Turbulence Generation for Eddy-Resolving Simulations of Turbomachinery Flows

[+] Author and Article Information
Sunil K. Arolla

Sibley School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Cornell University,
Ithaca, NY 14853
e-mail: ska62@cornell.edu

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received May 7, 2014; final manuscript received August 18, 2015; published online October 1, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Sharath S. Girimaji.

J. Fluids Eng 138(3), 031201 (Oct 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: FE-14-1243; doi: 10.1115/1.4031428 History: Received May 07, 2014; Revised August 18, 2015

A simple variant of recycling and rescaling method to generate inflow turbulence using unstructured grid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes is presented. The method has been validated on large eddy simulation (LES) of spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer. The proposed rescaling algorithm is based on the momentum thickness which is more robust and essentially obviates the need of finding the edge of the turbulent boundary layer in unstructured grid codes. Extension of this algorithm to hybrid Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) LES type of approaches and for wall-bounded turbomachinery flows is also discussed. Results from annular diffuser with different inflow boundary layer characteristics are presented as an example application to show the utility of such an algorithm.

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Figures

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Fig. 3

LES of 30 deg sector of the annular diffuser: (a) schematic of the computational domain and (b) nomenclature used in the algorithm

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Fig. 2

RANS simulation of flat plate boundary layer using recycling and rescaling procedure: Mean velocity profile in wall units

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Fig. 7

LES of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer: sensitivity to the initial conditions. (a) Velocity profile from initialization 1: solid line represents streamwise velocity, dashed and dashed-dotted lines represent wall-normal and spanwise velocities, respectively. (b) Velocity profile from initialization 2: Solid line represents streamwise velocity, dashed and dashed-dotted lines represent wall-normal and spanwise velocities, respectively. (c) Time evolution of friction velocity at the inlet: solid line represents initialization 1 and dashed double dotted line represents initialization 2.

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Fig. 12

Vortical structures predicted using Q-criterion: (a) LES and (b) IDDES

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Fig. 4

LES of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer: one-point statistics (a) mean velocity in wall units and (b) Reynolds stress components in wall units

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Fig. 5

Comparison of normalized mass flux across the inflow boundary. The dashed line represents a method using 99% boundary layer thickness, solid line for a method using momentum thickness.

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Fig. 6

Time evolution of the friction velocity at the inlet. The dashed line represents a method using 99% boundary layer thickness, solid line for a method using momentum thickness.

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Fig. 8

Sensitivity to the spanwise grid resolution on mean velocity. In wall units, solid line shows simulation with Δx+≈45, Δz+≈12 in the streamwise and spanwise directions, respectively. The dashed line represents Δx+≈45, Δz+≈24, and the dotted line represents Δx+≈90, Δz+≈12.

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Fig. 9

Sensitivity to the location of the recycling plane. The solid line represents recycling plane placed at 5δ99%, dashed line is for 1δ99%, and dotted line is for 10δ99%.

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Fig. 10

IDDES of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer: one-point statistics (a) mean velocity in wall units and (b) Reynolds stress components in wall units

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Fig. 11

Comparison of skin friction variation predicted by LES and IDDES

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Fig. 13

Cross plane velocity contours: (a) case 1: θr = 4% of (ro − ri) and (b) case 2: θr = 0:3% of (ro − ri)

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Fig. 14

Vortical structures predicted in the annular diffuser using Q-criterion: (a) case 1: θr = 4% of (ro − ri) and (b) case 2: θr = 0:3% of (ro − ri)

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Fig. 15

LES of 30 deg sector of the annular diffuser. Profiles are extracted at the inlet to the diffuser. Solid lines: case 1, dotted lines: case 2. (a) Reynolds shear stress profiles and (b) mean velocity.

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Fig. 16

Profiles are extracted within the diffuser at X/(Ro−Ri)=8, near the inlet section. Solid lines: case 1, dotted lines: case 2. (a) Reynolds shear stress profiles and (b) mean velocity.

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Fig. 17

Profiles are extracted within the diffuser at X/(Ro−Ri)=10. Solid lines: case 1, dotted lines: case 2. (a) Reynolds shear stress profiles and (b) mean velocity.

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Fig. 18

Profiles are extracted within the diffuser at X/(Ro−Ri)=12. Solid lines: case 1, dotted lines: case 2. (a) Reynolds shear stress profiles and (b) mean velocity.

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Fig. 19

Profiles are extracted within the diffuser at X/(Ro−Ri)=13.75, near the exit. Solid lines: case 1, dotted lines: case 2. (a) Reynolds shear stress profiles and (b) mean velocity.

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