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Technical Brief

Bubble Motion in a Converging–Diverging Channel

[+] Author and Article Information
Harsha Konda, Manoj Kumar Tripathi

Department of Chemical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad,
Kandi,
Sangareddy 502285, Telangana, India

Kirti Chandra Sahu

Department of Chemical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad,
Kandi,
Sangareddy 502285, Telangana, India
e-mail: ksahu@iith.ac.in

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received May 19, 2015; final manuscript received October 27, 2015; published online February 17, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Francine Battaglia.

J. Fluids Eng 138(6), 064501 (Feb 17, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: FE-15-1342; doi: 10.1115/1.4032296 History: Received May 19, 2015; Revised October 27, 2015

The migration of a bubble inside a two-dimensional converging–diverging channel is investigated numerically. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of the Reynolds and Weber numbers and the amplitude of the converging–diverging channel. It is found that increasing the Reynolds number and the amplitude of the channel increases the oscillation of the bubble and promotes the migration of the bubble toward one of the channel wall. The bubble undergoes oblate–prolate deformation periodically at the early times, which becomes chaotic at the later times. This phenomenon is a culmination of the bubble path instability as well as the Segré–Silberberg effect.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic diagram (not to scale) of the bubble motion inside a two-dimensional converging–diverging symmetric channel. Fluid B constitutes the continuous phase and fluid A is initially confined to a circular region (bubble) of radius, r.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

The variation of yCG and Ar in the axial direction for channels having different values of Φ. The parameter values are Re = 60, We = 1, ρr = 10−3, and μr = 10−2.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

The variation of yCG and Ar in the axial direction for different values of h: (a) and (b) Re = 80 and We = 1and (c) and (d) Re = 140 and We = 5. The rest of the parameter values are ρr = 10−3 and μr = 10−2.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The spatiotemporal evolution of horizontal (top panel) and vertical (bottom wall) velocity components at different times. The rest of the parameter values are ρr = 10−3, μr = 10−2, Re = 120, and We = 5. The grayscale bars for horizontal and vertical velocity components are given for t = 100 only, which are same for the other t values.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

The spatiotemporal evolution of horizontal (top panel) and vertical (bottom wall) velocity components at different times. The rest of the parameter values are ρr = 10−3, μr = 10−2, Re = 70, and We = 1. The grayscale bars for horizontal and vertical velocity components are given for t = 100 only, which are same for the other t values.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The variation of (a) yCG, (b) vCG, and (c) Ar in the axial direction for different values of Re. The rest of the parameter values are ρr = 10−3, μr = 10−2, and We = 5.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

The variation of (a) yCG, (b) vCG, and (c) Ar in the axial direction for different values of Re. The rest of the parameter values are ρr = 10−3, μr = 10−2, and We = 1.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Comparison of the shapes of the bubble: (a) and (c) at x = 9.537 and (b) and (d) at x = 14.37 for two different grid refinements. The panels (a) and (b) and (c) and (d) correspond to We = 10 and We = 25, respectively. Grid 1 (shown by solid line): minimum grid sizes near the boundary and the fluid regions are 0.031 and 0.015, respectively. Grid 2 (shown by dashed line): minimum grid sizes near the boundary and the fluid regions are 0.015 and 0.008, respectively. The rest of the parameter values are ρr = 10−3, μr = 10−2, and Re = 100.

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