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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Experiments and Modeling Study of Jets in Crossflow

[+] Author and Article Information
Luke Thompson

Center for Advanced Turbomachinery and
Energy Research (CATER),
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
12760 Pegasus Boulevard,
P.O. Box 162450,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: lukezt@knights.ucf.edu

Greg Natsui

Center for Advanced Turbomachinery and
Energy Research (CATER),
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
12760 Pegasus Boulevard,
P.O. Box 162450,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: gnatsui@knights.ucf.edu

Carlos Velez

Center for Advanced Turbomachinery and
Energy Research (CATER),
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
12760 Pegasus Boulevard,
P.O. Box 162450,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: velezcar@yahoo.com

Jayanta Kapat

Professor
Mem. ASME
Center for Advanced Turbomachinery and
Energy Research (CATER),
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
12760 Pegasus Boulevard,
P.O. Box 162450,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: Jayanta.Kapat@ucf.edu

Subith S. Vasu

Professor
Mem. ASME
Center for Advanced Turbomachinery and
Energy Research (CATER),
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
12760 Pegasus Boulevard,
P.O. Box 162450,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: subith@ucf.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received May 16, 2015; final manuscript received December 27, 2015; published online April 22, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Feng Liu.

J. Fluids Eng 138(8), 081201 (Apr 22, 2016) (12 pages) Paper No: FE-15-1332; doi: 10.1115/1.4032581 History: Received May 16, 2015; Revised December 27, 2015

Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) with acetone seeding was applied to measure the scalar fields of an axisymmetric freejet and an inclined jet in crossflow as applicable to film cooling. From the scalar fields, jet-mixing and trajectory characteristics were obtained. In order to validate the technique, the canonical example of a nonreacting freejet of Reynolds numbers 900–9000 was investigated. Desired structural characteristics were observed and showed strong agreement with computational modeling. After validating the technique with the axisymmetric jet, the jet in crossflow was tested with various velocity ratios and jet injection angles. Results indicated the degree of wall separation for different injection angles and demonstrated both the time-averaged trajectories as well as select near-wall concentration results for varying jet momentum fluxes. Consistent with literature findings, the orthogonal jet trajectory for varying blowing ratios collapsed when scaled by the jet-to-freestream velocity ratio and hole diameter, rd. Similar collapsing was demonstrated in the cases of a nonorthogonal jets. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the openfoam software were used to compare predictions with select experimental cases and yielded reasonable agreement. Insight into the importance and structure of the counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) and general flow field turbulence was highlighted by cross validation between CFD and experimental results.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Flow structure of a jet in crossflow

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Fig. 2

Basic experimental configuration for the jet in crossflow study

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Fig. 3

Wind tunnel schematic

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Fig. 4

solidworks model of interchangeable jet nozzle coupons with jet channel highlighted

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Fig. 5

Maps of (a) the average raw fluorescence initially captured by the camera. (b) Normalized concentration map of the jet after background, absorption, and laser sheet corrections.

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Fig. 6

Compared concentration maps of an experimental and modeled freejet with Re = 9000

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Fig. 7

Instantaneous images for three Reynolds numbers: Re = 9000 (left), Re = 3152 (middle), and Re = 900 (right)

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Fig. 8

Concentration profiles for different momentum flux conditions of 30 deg jet

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Fig. 9

Trajectories for different momentum flux conditions of orthogonal jet: (a) scaled by d, (b) scaled by rd, and (c) scaled by r2d

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Fig. 10

Maximum concentrations indicate trajectories for different momentum flux conditions of 30 deg inclined jet: (a) scaled by d and (b) scaled by rd

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Fig. 11

Concentration profiles for varying velocity ratios at (a) 2 d downstream of jet exit and (b) 10 d downstream

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Fig. 12

Unscaled (a) and scaled (b) trajectories for varying jet angles for a fixed velocity ratio of r = 0.51

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Fig. 13

Experimental (a) and openfoam (b) normalized concentration maps of a 30 deg jet with r = 1.7

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Fig. 14

CVP development downstream of 30 deg r = 1.7 jet at downstream planes of (a) x = 1.58d, (b) x = 3.91d, (c) x = 6.38d, and (d) x = 8.97d

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Fig. 15

Comparison of experimental and numerical modeling reported trajectories

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Fig. 16

Comparison of trajectories of 30 deg, r = 1.7 jet in crossflow, for the experimentally measured case and two simulations with different boundary layer thicknesses

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