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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Ferrofluid Capillary Rise in Porous Medium Under the Action of Nonuniform Magnetic Field

[+] Author and Article Information
Arthur Zakinyan

Department of General and Theoretical Physics,
Institute of Mathematics and Natural Sciences,
North Caucasus Federal University,
1 Pushkin Street,
Stavropol 355009, Russia
e-mail: zakinyan.a.r@mail.ru

Levon Mkrtchyan, Victoria Grunenko, Yuri Dikansky

Department of General and Theoretical Physics,
Institute of Mathematics and Natural Sciences,
North Caucasus Federal University,
1 Pushkin Street,
Stavropol 355009, Russia

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 16, 2016; final manuscript received July 9, 2016; published online October 18, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Mark R. Duignan.

J. Fluids Eng 139(1), 011204 (Oct 18, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: FE-16-1038; doi: 10.1115/1.4034361 History: Received January 16, 2016; Revised July 09, 2016

The capillary flow of a ferrofluid in a single cylindrical capillary tube and through a sandy porous medium under the action of a nonuniform magnetic field is studied experimentally. The dynamics of the capillary rise and the static case have been considered. It has been shown that the nonuniform magnetic field with upward directed gradient accelerates the capillary rise; contrary, the nonuniform magnetic field with downward directed gradient decelerates the capillary rise. Time dependences of the ferrofluid height and maximum reachable height of ferrofluid have been analyzed. The method of the study of ferrofluid capillary rise based on the use of magnetic measurements has been proposed. It has been demonstrated that porous material parameters can be extracted from the results of measurements of the inductances of the solenoid with porous medium inside and the small sensing coil within a single experiment.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Microscopic image of the grains of the sand sample used in the experiments

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Fig. 3

Example of the dependences of the magnetic field strength on the distance from the electromagnet poles at different values of the field strengths in the immediate vicinity of the poles H0

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Fig. 4

Magnetization curve of the ferrofluid used in the experiments

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Fig. 5

Time dependence of the ferrofluid height in a single cylindrical capillary for different orientations of the magnetic field gradient. Dots represent experimental data. Corresponding calculations are shown by solid lines.

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Fig. 6

Maximum reachable height of ferrofluid in a single cylindrical capillary versus the magnetic field strength at the capillary bottom. Dots are experiments; lines are calculations.

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Fig. 7

Time dependence of the ferrofluid height in a sandy porous medium for different orientations of the magnetic field gradient. Dots are experiments; lines are calculations.

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Fig. 8

Time dependence of the relative inductance of the solenoid filled with sand during the ferrofluid capillary rise

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Fig. 9

The relative inductance of the sensing coil as a function of its location (height) on a tube filled with sand after the establishment of static position of wetting front

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Fig. 10

Time dependence of the ferrofluid height in a sand column obtained by means of magnetic measurements (calculated according to Eq. (6) from the data presented in Fig. 8) in comparison with the results of visual observations presented in Fig. 7

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