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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Miniature Viscous Disk Pump: Performance Variations From Non-Newtonian Elastic Turbulence

[+] Author and Article Information
Phil Ligrani

Fellow ASME
Propulsion Research Center,
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Alabama in Huntsville,
5000 Technology Drive,
Olin B. King Technology Hall S236,
Huntsville, AL 35899
e-mail: pml0006@uah.edu

Benjamin Lund

Propulsion Research Center,
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Alabama in Huntsville,
5000 Technology Drive,
Olin B. King Technology Hall N202A,
Huntsville, AL 35899
e-mail: brl0007@uah.edu

Arshia Fatemi

Robert Bosch GmbH (CR/ARF2),
Robert Bosch Central Research 130-1,
Robert Bosch Campus 1,
Renningen 71272, Germany
e-mail: Arshia.Fatemi@de.bosch.com

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 28, 2016; final manuscript received August 10, 2016; published online November 3, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Hui Hu.

J. Fluids Eng 139(2), 021104 (Nov 03, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: FE-16-1201; doi: 10.1115/1.4034522 History: Received March 28, 2016; Revised August 10, 2016

Within the present investigation, a miniature viscous disk pump (VDP) is utilized to characterize and quantify non-Newtonian fluid elastic turbulence effects, relative to Newtonian flow behavior. Such deviations from Newtonian behavior are induced by adding polyacrylamide to purified water. The VDP consists of a 10.16 mm diameter disk that rotates above a C-shaped channel with inner and outer radii of 1.19 mm and 2.38 mm, respectively. A channel depth of 230 μm is employed. Fluid inlet and outlet ports are located at the ends of the C-shaped channel. Experimental data are given for rotational speeds of 126 1/s, 188 1/s, 262 1/s, and 366 1/s, pressure rises as high as 700 Pa, and flow rates up to approximately 0.00000005 m3/s. Reynolds number ranges from 2.9 to 6.5 for the non-Newtonian polyacrylamide solution flows and from 51.6 to 149.8 for the Newtonian pure water flows. To characterize deviations due to non-Newtonian elastic turbulence phenomena, two new parameters are introduced, PrR and HCR, where HCR is the ratio of head coefficient (HC) for the polyacrylamide solution and head coefficient for the water solution, and PrR is the ratio of pump power for the polyacrylamide solution and pump power for the water solution. Relative to Newtonian, pure water flows, the polyacrylamide solution flows give pump head coefficient data, dimensional pressure rise data, slip coefficients (SCs), specific speed (SS) values, and dimensional power data, which show significant variations and differences as they vary with flow coefficient (FC) or dimensional volumetric flow rate. Also important are different ranges of specific speed (SS) for the pure water and polyacrylamide solutions, and a lower range of SC or slip coefficient values for the polyacrylamide solution flows, compared to the pure water flows. These variations are due to increased elastic turbulence losses, which occur as viscosity magnitudes increase and the elastic polymers are excited by mechanical stress, which causes them to extend, deform, stretch, and intertwine.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Cross-sectional view and side view of the viscous disk pump—VDP. All the dimensions are given in millimeters.

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Fig. 2

Configuration of the single-disk viscous pump, including coordinate system. The shaded region of the pump chamber is used for the flow analysis. The z-coordinate is directed normal to the surface and measured from the halfway location between the surface and the disk, at the horizontal center plane of the flow passage.

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Fig. 3

Arrangement and components for the single-disk viscous pump for pressure measurements. All the dimensions are given in millimeters.

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Fig. 4

Dimensional absolute viscosity variation with dimensional disk rotational speed, from the Anton Paar Rheometer MCR 302, and determined using effective viscosity values from Eq. (2)

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Fig. 5

Dimensional pressure rise variation with dimensional volumetric flow rate for pure water for disk rotational speeds from 126 1/s to 366 1/s. The chamber height of the single-disk viscous pump is 230 μm. N is the Newtonian fluid analytic result, and E is the experimental data. Note that the lines and solid symbols (denoted with N) provide analytically predicted results.

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Fig. 6

Dimensional pressure rise variation with dimensional volumetric flow rate for the single-disk viscous pump for disk rotational speeds of 126 1/s, 262 1/s, and 366 1/s. The pump chamber height is 230 μm. Data are given for a pure water solution (closed symbols), and for a polyacrylamide solution (open symbols). Note that lines are included within the figure to show data trends.

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Fig. 7

Dimensional pressure rise variation with dimensional disk rotational speed for the pure water and for the polyacrylamide solution with zero volumetric flow rate, Q = 0. The viscous disk pump chamber height is 230 μm.

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Fig. 8

Dimensional pressure rise variation with dimensional disk rotational speed for the pure water and for the polyacrylamide solution with a volumetric flow rate Q of 0.00000002 m3/s. The viscous disk pump chamber height is 230 μm.

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Fig. 9

Head coefficient variation with flow coefficient for the single-disk viscous pump for disk rotational speeds of 126 1/s, 188 1/s, 262 1/s, and 366 1/s. The pump chamber height is 230 μm. (a) Pure water solution and (b) polyacrylamide solution. Note that lines are included within the figure to show data trends. Also note that only one line is employed within the lower figure to show data trends for rotational speeds of 126 1/s and 188 1/s.

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Fig. 10

Dimensional power variation with flow coefficient for the single-disk viscous pump for disk rotational speeds of 126 1/s, 188 1/s, 262 1/s, and 366 1/s. The pump chamber height is 230 μm. (a) Pure water solution and (b) polyacrylamide solution. Note that lines are included within the figure to show data trends.

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Fig. 11

Slip coefficient variation with head coefficient for the single-disk viscous pump for disk rotational speeds of 126 1/s, 188 1/s, 262 1/s, and 366 1/s. The pump chamber height is 230 μm. Data are given for pure water solutions (closed symbols), and for polyacrylamide solutions (open symbols). Note that lines are included within the figure to show data trends.

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Fig. 12

Dimensional pressure difference (ΔP*) (between pure water flow and polyacrylamide solution flow) variation with dimensional volumetric flow rate. Data are given for disk rotational speeds of 366 1/s, 262 1/s, 188 1/s, and 126 1/s. The viscous disk pump chamber height is 230 μm. Note that lines are included within the figure to show data trends.

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Fig. 13

Ratio of head coefficient for the polyacrylamide solution and head coefficient for the water solution, as it varies with flow coefficient for the single-disk viscous pump for disk rotational speeds of 126 1/s, 262 1/s, and 366 1/s. The pump chamber height is 230 μm.

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Fig. 14

Ratio of pump power for the polyacrylamide solution and pump power for the water solution, as it varies with flow coefficient for the single-disk viscous pump for disk rotational speeds of 126 1/s, 262 1/s, and 366 1/s. The pump chamber height is 230 μm.

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Fig. 15

Specific speed variation with FC for the single-disk viscous pump for disk rotational speeds of 126 1/s, 188 1/s, 262 1/s, and 366 1/s. The pump chamber height is 230 μm. (a) Pure water solution and (b) polyacrylamide solution. Note that lines are included within the figure to show data trends.

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