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research-article

Dissipative Effects of Bubbles and Particles in Shear Flows

[+] Author and Article Information
Campbell Dinsmore

Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University at Pomona, Pomona, CA 91768Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521
cadinsmore@cpp.edu

AmirHessam Aminfar

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521
aamin006@ucr.edu

Marko Princevac

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521
marko@engr.ucr.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4035946 History: Received February 18, 2016; Revised January 27, 2017

Abstract

Chemical reactors, air lubrication systems, and the aeration of the oceans rely, either in part or in whole, on the interaction of bubbles and their surrounding liquid. Even though bubbly mixtures have been studied at both the macroscopic and bubble level, the dissipation field associated with an individual bubble in a shear flow has not been thoroughly investigated. Exploring the nature of this phenomenon is critical not only when examining the effect a bubble has on the dissipation in a bulk shear flow but also when a micro-bubble interacts with turbulent eddies near the Kolmogorov length scale. In order to further our understanding of this behavior, this study investigated these interactions both analytically and experimentally. From an analytical perspective, expressions were developed for the dissipation associated with the creeping flow fields in and around a fluid particle immersed in a linear shear flow. Experimentally, tests were conducted using a simple test setup that corroborated the general findings of the theoretical investigation. Both the analytical and experimental results indicate that the presence of bubbles in a bulk shear flow causes elevated dissipation of kinetic energy.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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