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research-article

The topology of a precessing ow within a suddenly expanding axisymmetric chamber

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiao Chen

School of Mechanical Engineering Centre for Energy Technology (CET) The University of Adelaide Adelaide, South Australia, 5005 Australia
xiao.chen01@adelaide.edu.au

Zhao F. Tian

School of Mechanical Engineering Centre for Energy Technology (CET) The University of Adelaide Adelaide, South Australia, 5005 Australia
zhao.tian@adelaide.edu.au

Richard M. Kelso

School of Mechanical Engineering Centre for Energy Technology (CET) The University of Adelaide Adelaide, South Australia, 5005 Australia
richard.kelso@adelaide.edu.au

Graham J. Nathan

School of Mechanical Engineering Centre for Energy Technology (CET) The University of Adelaide Adelaide, South Australia, 5005 Australia
graham.nathan@adelaide.edu.au

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4035950 History: Received November 08, 2016; Revised January 31, 2017

Abstract

A comprehensive study on the flow structure of an ensemble-averaged fluidic precessing jet (FPJ) flow is reported. This study is based on the concepts of critical point theory, previous experimental data and validated simulation results. The unsteady Shear Stress Transport turbulence model was adopted for the simulation, which provided well resolved details of the flow. The numerical model successfully reproduced the four main flow features of the FPJ flow. The predicted precession frequency, the total fluctuation energy, the equivalent diameter and the centreline velocity of the phase-averaged FPJ flow were compared against the measured results and found to give reasonable agreement. The streamlines, velocity and vorticity contours in a series of cross-sectional planes are presented. The calculated streamlines at the surfaces of the nozzle and the centre-body are compared with previously deduced surface flow patterns. With these methods, a vortex skeleton with six main vortex cores of the FPJ flow within the nozzle is identified for the first time. This skeleton, which is illustrated diagramatically, is deduced to be responsible for the jet precession.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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