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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Growth of an Air/SF6 Turbulent Mixing Zone in a Shock Tube

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Griffond, J.-F. Haas, D. Souffland

CEA, DAM, DIF,
Arpajon F-91297, France

G. Bouzgarrou, S. Jamme

Institut Supérieur de l'Aéronautique et de
l'Espace (ISAE),
Université de Toulouse,
Toulouse 31400, France

Y. Bury

Institut Supérieur de l'Aéronautique
et de l'Espace (ISAE),
Université de Toulouse,
Toulouse 31400, France

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received November 8, 2016; final manuscript received March 21, 2017; published online June 28, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Mark F. Tachie.

J. Fluids Eng 139(9), 091205 (Jun 28, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: FE-16-1733; doi: 10.1115/1.4036369 History: Received November 08, 2016; Revised March 21, 2017

Shock-induced mixing experiments have been conducted in a vertical shock tube of 130 mm square cross section located at ISAE. A shock wave traveling at Mach 1.2 in air hits a geometrically disturbed interface separating air and SF6, a gas five times heavier than air, filling a chamber of length L up to the end of the shock tube. Both gases are initially separated by a 0.5 μm thick nitrocellulose membrane maintained parallel to the shock front by two wire grids: an upper one with mesh spacing equal to either ms = 1.8 mm or 12.1 mm, and a lower one with a mesh spacing equal to ml = 1 mm. Weak dependence of the mixing zone growth after reshock (interaction of the mixing zone with the shock wave reflected from the top end of the test chamber) with respect to L and ms is observed despite a clear imprint of the mesh spacing ms in the schlieren images. Numerical simulations representative of these configurations are conducted: the simulations successfully replicate the experimentally observed weak dependence on L, but are unable to show the experimentally observed independence with respect to ms while matching the morphological features of the schlieren pictures.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Description of the experimental test rig and (Xt) diagram of the experiment

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Fig. 2

Nitrocellulose membrane setup at the gaseous interface

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Fig. 3

Schlieren pictures of a shot with the fine upper grid (ms = 1.8 mm). The full 130 mm cross section of the T130 shock tube is visible. (a) Before reshock: the TMZ is seen in the lower part of the figure, traveling to the top, whereas the (horizontal) shock front coming from above is just appearing in the top of the picture. (b) and (c) After reshock: the TMZ is seen in the middle part of figure, traveling to the bottom, whereas the reflected rarefaction going upward is escaping the frame on the top. The same picture is used to show the edges of the TMZ as detected by the two filters.

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Fig. 4

TMZ width with respect to time for experiments with the fine upper grid (ms = 1.8 mm). Five SF6 chamber lengths L are used: L = 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 mm and the two edge detection filters (open and filled symbols) are shown. The time origin corresponds to the instant of reshock.

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Fig. 5

TMZ width with respect to time for experiments with L = 250 mm. The two upper grids with fine (ms = 1.8 mm) and large (ms = 12.1 mm) mesh grid and the two edge detection filters (open and filled symbols) are shown. The time origin corresponds to the instant of reshock.

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Fig. 6

Schlieren pictures taken just before reshock with the two fragmentation grids: (a) fine upper grid and (b) coarse upper grid

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Fig. 7

Two-dimensional schemes of the perturbation building blocks for two interwire cells: bottom—egg-box and top—wire-wake

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Fig. 8

“Egg-box” initialization with (left) fine ms = 1.8 mm and (right) coarse ms = 12 mm fragmentation grid: (top) pseudo-color of the virtual interface deformation used for initialization, (bottom) interface at 0.05 ms after initialization

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Fig. 9

“Wire-wake” initialization with (left) fine ms = 1.8 mm and (right) coarse ms = 12 mm fragmentation grid: (top) pseudo-color of the virtual interface deformation used for initialization, (bottom) interface at 0.05 ms after initialization

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Fig. 10

Longitudinal velocity spectrum in the plane of the interface at time 0.05 ms. The two kinds of initializations are shown for the configuration with ms = 12 mm and ml = 1 mm. The horizontal wavenumber k=kx2+kz2 is normalized so that k/k0 = 1 corresponds to the full width l0 of the computational domain.

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Fig. 11

TMZ width with respect to time for the fragmentation grid ms = 1.8 mm for two chamber lengths L = 150 mm and L = 250 mm. Experiments: symbols, simulations: lines.

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Fig. 12

TMZ width with respect to time for the chamber length L = 250 mm and for the two fragmentation grids ms = 1.8 mm and ms = 12.1 mm. Experiments: filled symbols, simulations ms = 1.8 mm: lines, simulations ms = 12 mm: open symbols.

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Fig. 13

Schlieren pictures of the TMZ with the fine fragmentation grid ms = 1.8 mm just before reshock (L = 250 mm and t = 2.1 ms). Experiment in the center and simulation with wire-wake and egg-box initializations on either sides.

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Fig. 14

Schlieren pictures of the TMZ with the coarse fragmentation grid ms = 12.1 mm just before reshock (L = 250 mm and t = 2.1 ms). Experiment in the center and simulation with wire-wake and egg-box initializations on either sides.

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Fig. 15

Schlieren pictures of the TMZ with the fine fragmentation grid ms = 1.8 mm after postreshock growth (t = 3.0 ms). Experiment in the center and simulation with wire-wake and egg-box initializations on either sides.

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Fig. 16

Schlieren pictures of the TMZ with the coarse fragmentation grid ms = 12.1 mm after postreshock growth (t = 2.85 ms). Experiment in the center and simulation with wire-wake and egg-box initializations on either sides.

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Fig. 17

Longitudinal velocity spectrum in the plane of the interface at time 3 ms for L = 250 mm. The configurations with the two upper grids ms = 12.1 mm and ms = 1.8 mm are shown for the two kinds of initialization.

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