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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Experimental Study of Suction Flow Control Effectiveness in a Serpentine Intake

[+] Author and Article Information
M. C. Keerthi

Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh, India
e-mail: mckee@iitk.ac.in

Abhijit Kushari

Mem. ASME
Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh, India
e-mail: akushari@iitk.ac.in

Valliammai Somasundaram

Aeronautical Development Agency,
Bengaluru 560017, Karnataka, India
e-mail: valli@jetmail.ada.gov.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 28, 2016; final manuscript received May 17, 2017; published online July 21, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Feng Liu.

J. Fluids Eng 139(10), 101104 (Jul 21, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: FE-16-1198; doi: 10.1115/1.4036827 History: Received March 28, 2016; Revised May 17, 2017

The intakes of modern aircraft are subjected to ever-increasing demands in their performance. Particularly, they are expected to carry out diffusion with the highest isentropic efficiency while subjected to aggressive geometry requirements arising from stealth considerations. To avoid a penalty in engine performance, the flow through intake needs to be controlled using various methods of flow control. In this study, a serpentine intake is studied experimentally and its performance compared with and without boundary layer suction. The performance parameters used are nondimensional total pressure loss coefficient and standard total pressure distortion descriptors. The effect is observed on surface pressure distributions, and inferences are made regarding separation location and extent. A detailed measurement at the exit plane shows flow structures that draw attention to secondary flows within the duct. Suction is applied at three different locations, spanning different number of ports along each location, comprising of ten unique configurations. The mass flow rate of suction employed ranges from 1.1% to 6.7% of mass flow rate at the inlet of the intake. The effect is seen on exit total pressure recovery as well as circumferential and radial distortion parameters. This is examined in the context of the location of the suction ports and amount of suction mass flow, by the deviation in surface pressure distributions, as well as the separation characteristics from the baseline case. The results show that applying suction far upstream of the separation point together with a modest amount of suction downstream results in the best performance.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Schematic of the wind tunnel, (b) schematic of the serpentine intake diffuser with the transition section, and (c) details of the intake with reference locations labeled

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Fig. 2

(a) Photograph of the downstream end of the intake model with flow control ports, (b) schematic of the same section showing the arrangement of ports, and (c) configuration of suction ports for different cases

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Fig. 3

Circumferential distortion intensity and extent definitions (inset: choice of area for PWORST-60)

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Fig. 4

Variation of wall static pressure coefficient along the upper and lower wall centerlines

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Fig. 5

Variation of indicative skin-friction coefficient along the upper and lower wall centerlines

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Fig. 6

(a) Total pressure loss coefficient contours and (b) streamwise velocity magnitude contours in the AIP for the intake without flow control

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Fig. 7

Circumferential distortion intensity and extent for each radial station for the baseline case

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Fig. 8

Variation of total pressure loss coefficient for the baseline case, with in-plane streamlines overlaid

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Fig. 9

Variation of wall static pressure coefficient along the lower wall centerline for all the cases

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Fig. 10

Variation of wall static pressure coefficient along the upper wall (a) for the entire length of the duct (b) expanded for the region of interest between x/c = 0.6 and 1.0. Legend specifications are identical to those in Fig. 9.

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Fig. 11

Variation of indicative skin-friction coefficient along the upper wall centerline within the region of interest. Legend specifications are identical to those in Fig. 9.

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Fig. 12

Total pressure loss coefficient contours in the AIP for all flow controlled cases: (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, (d) case 4, (e) case 5, (f) case 6A, (g) case 6B, (h) case 7A, (i) case 7B, (j) case 8, (k) case 9, and (l) case 10

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Fig. 13

Circumferential distortion intensity at different radial stations for all the cases. Legend specifications are identical to those in Fig. 9.

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Fig. 14

Circumferential distortion extent at different radial stations for all the cases. Legend specifications are identical to those in Fig. 9.

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Fig. 15

Radial distortion intensity at different radial stations for all the cases. Legend specifications are identical to those in Fig. 9.

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Fig. 16

Variation of total pressure loss coefficient for the case 8, with in-plane streamlines overlaid

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Fig. 17

The performance of various suction configurations compared using the parameters (a) average total pressure loss coefficient, ωAV, (b) maximum total pressure loss coefficient, ωMAX, and (c) DC60

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