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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

Numerical Simulations for the Wake Prediction of a Marine Propeller in Straight-Ahead Flow and Oblique Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
E. Guilmineau

LHEEA,
CNRS 6598,
Ecole Centrale de Nantes 1 rue de la
Noë BP 92101,
Nantes Cedex 3 44321, France
e-mail: Emmanuel.Guilmineau@ec-nantes.fr

G. B. Deng, A. Leroyer, P. Queutey, M. Visonneau, J. Wackers

LHEEA,
CNRS 6598,
Ecole Centrale de Nantes 1 rue de la
Noë BP 92101,
Nantes Cedex 3 44321, France

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 5, 2016; final manuscript received August 28, 2017; published online November 3, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Olivier Coutier-Delgosha.

J. Fluids Eng 140(2), 021111 (Nov 03, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: FE-16-1574; doi: 10.1115/1.4037984 History: Received September 05, 2016; Revised August 28, 2017

This paper presents the capability of a numerical code, isis-cfd, based on the solution of the Navier–Stokes equations, for the investigation on the hydrodynamic characteristics of a marine propeller in open water. Two propellers are investigated: the Istituto Nazionale per Studi ed Esperienze di Architectura Navale (INSEAN) E779A model in straight-ahead flow and the Potsdam Propeller Test Case (PPTC) model in oblique flow. The objectives of this study are to establish capabilities of various turbulent closures to predict the wake propeller and to predict the instability processes in the wake if it exists. Two Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) models are used: the k–ω shear stress transport (SST) of Menter and an anisotropic two-equation explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model (EARSM). A hybrid RANS–large eddy simulation (LES) model is also used. Computational results for global flow quantities are discussed and compared with experimental data. These quantities are in good agreement with the measured data. The hybrid RANS–LES model allows to capture the evolution of the tip vortices. For the INSEAN E779A model, the instability of the wake is only predicted with a hybrid RANS–LES model, and the position of these instabilities is in good agreement with the experimental visualizations.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

INSEAN E779 model: (a) front view and (b) side view

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Fig. 2

PPTC model: (a) front view and (b) side view

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Fig. 3

INSEAN model: view of the mesh in the plane Y = 0

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Fig. 4

PPTC model: view of the mesh in the plane Y = 0

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Fig. 5

PPTC model: view of the mesh in the plane X = 0

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Fig. 6

INSEAN model: open-water characteristics

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Fig. 7

INSEAN model: J = 0.71—visualization of the vortical structures (λ2 = −2): (a) k–ω shear stress transport (SST), (b) EARSM, and (c) DES

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Fig. 8

INSEAN model: J = 0.71—TKE in the plane Y = 0: (a) k–ω SST, (b) EARSM, and (c) DES

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Fig. 9

INSEAN model: J = 0.71—instantaneous visualization of the vortical structures with DES approach (λ2 = −2)

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Fig. 10

INSEAN model: J = 0.71—axial velocity at X = 110 mm in the wake of the propeller: (a) k–ω SST, (b) EARSM, (c) DES, and (d) experiments

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Fig. 11

INSEAN model: J = 0.45—comparison of vortical structures between a DES approach and experiments (λ2 = −2): (a) DES (instantaneous view) and (b) experimental view (Fig. 8 in Ref. [1])

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Fig. 12

INSEAN model: J = 0.45—visualization of the vortical structures (λ2 = −2): (a) k–ω SST, (b) EARSM, and (c) DES

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Fig. 13

PPTC model: open-water characteristics

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Fig. 14

PPTC model: force and moment coefficients on a single blade: (a) KTx, (b) KTy, (c) KTz, (d) KQx, (e) KQy, and (f) KQz

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Fig. 15

PPTC model: visualization of the vortical structures (λ2 = −2) at θ = 50.7 deg with the k–ω SST turbulence model: (a) J = 0.60, (b) J = 0.80, (c) J = 1.00, (d) J = 1.20, and (e) J = 1.40

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Fig. 16

PPTC model: J = 1.00—visualization of the vortical structures (λ2 = −2) at θ = 14.74 deg: (a) k–ω SST, (b) EARSM, and (c) DES

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Fig. 17

PPTC model: J = 1.00—vorticity in the plane Y = 0 at θ = 14.74 deg: (a) k–ω SST, (b) EARSM, and (c) DES

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