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research-article

Particle Image Velocimetry Investigation of the Coherent Structures In a Leading-Edge Slat Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Patrick R. Richard

Graduate Student ASME Student Member Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Brunswick Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5A3
patrichard44@gmail.com

Stephen John Wilkins

Graduate Student ASME Student Member Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Brunswick Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5A3
Stephen_John.Wilkins@unb.ca

Joseph W. Hall

Associate Professor, ASME Member Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Brunswick Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5A3
jwhall@unb.ca

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038091 History: Received June 15, 2017; Revised September 21, 2017

Abstract

Air traffic volume is expected to triple in the U.S. and Europe by 2025, and as a result, the aerospace industry is facing stricter noise regulations. Apart from the engines, one of the significant contributors of aircraft noise is the deployment of high-lift devices, like leading-edge slats. In particular, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed on a scale-model wing equipped with a leading-edge slat in a wind tunnel. Two Reynolds numbers based on wing chord were studied: Re=6x10^5 and 1.3x10^6. A snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis indicated that differences in the time-averaged statistics between the two were tied to differences in the coherent structures formed in the slat cove shear layer. In particular, the lower Re flow seemed to be dominated by a large-scale vortex formed in the slat cove that was related to the unsteady flapping and subsequent impingement of the shear-layer onto the underside of the slat. A train of smaller, more regular vortices was detected for the larger Re case which seemed to cause the shear-layer to be less curved and impinge closer to the tail of the slat than for the lower Re case. The smaller structures are consistent with Rossiter modes being excited within the slat cove. The impingement of the shear-layers on, and the proximity of the vortices to the slat and the main wing are expected to be strong acoustic dipoles in both cases.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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