0
research-article

Analytical Upper Limit of Drag Reduction with Polymer Additives in Turbulent Pipe Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Xin Zhang

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada A1B 3X5
xz4476@mun.ca

Xili Duan

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada A1B 3X5
xduan@mun.ca

Yuri Muzychka

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada A1B 3X5
yurim@mun.ca

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038757 History: Received July 19, 2017; Revised November 29, 2017

Abstract

Flow drag reduction induced by chemical additives, more commonly called drag-reducing agents (DRAs), has been studied for many years, but few studies can manifest the mechanism of this phenomenon. In this paper, a new mathematical model is proposed to predict the upper limit of drag reduction with polymer DRAs in a turbulent pipe flow. The model is based on the classic FENE-P (Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic-Peterlin) theory, with the assumption that all vortex structures disappear in the turbulent flow, i.e., complete laminarization is achieved. With this model, the maximum drag reduction by a DRA at a given concentration can be predicted directly with several parameters, i.e., bulk velocity of the fluid, pipe size and relaxation time of the DRA. Besides, this model indicates that both viscosity and elasticity contribute to the drag reduction: before a critical concentration, both viscosity and elasticity affect the drag reduction positively; after this critical concentration, elasticity still works as before but viscosity affects drag reduction negatively. This study also proposes a correlation format between drag reduction measured in a rheometer and that estimated in a pipeline. This provides a convenient way of pipeline drag reduction estimation with viscosity and modulus of the fluids that can be easily measured in a rheometer.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In