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Research Papers: Techniques and Procedures

On the Approximation of Two-Dimensional Transient Pipe Flow Using a Modified Wave Propagation Algorithm

[+] Author and Article Information
Hossein Mahdizadeh

Department of Civil Engineering,
University of Birjand,
South Khorasan Province,
Birjand 97175615, Iran
e-mail: hossein.mahdizadeh@birjand.ac.ir

Soroosh Sharifi

School of Engineering,
Department of Civil Engineering,
University of Birmingham,
Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
e-mail: S.Sharifi@bham.ac.uk

Pourya Omidvar

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Yasouj University,
Daneshjoo Ave,
Yasouj 7591874934, Iran
e-mail: Omidvar@yu.ac.ir

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 30, 2017; final manuscript received January 9, 2018; published online March 16, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Sergio Pirozzoli.

J. Fluids Eng 140(7), 071402 (Mar 16, 2018) (7 pages) Paper No: FE-17-1202; doi: 10.1115/1.4039248 History: Received March 30, 2017; Revised January 09, 2018

In this study, a second-order accurate Godunov-type finite volume method is used for the solution of the two-dimensional (2D) water hammer problem. The numerical scheme applied here is well balanced and is able to treat the unsteady friction terms, together with the convective terms, within the differences between fluxes of neighboring computational cells. In order to consider the effect of unsteady friction terms during the water hammer process, kε and kω turbulence models are employed. The performance of the proposed method with the choice of different turbulence models is evaluated using experimental data obtained from one low and one high Reynolds-number turbulent test cases. In addition to velocity and pressure distributions, the turbulence characteristics of each variant of the model, including eddy viscosity, dissipation rate, and turbulent kinetic energy during the water hammer process are fully analyzed. It is found that the inclusion of the convective inertia terms leads to more accurate pressure profiles. The results also show that using a relatively high Courant–Friedrichs–Lewy (CFL) number close to unity, the introduced numerical solver with both choices of turbulence models provides reasonable and acceptable predictions for the studied flows.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Steady-state velocity profile computed using the k−ε and k−ω turbulence models: (a) test case 1 (Re = 5600) and (b) test case 2 (Re = 15,800)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Comparison between the pressure head computed using the MFWC and MFW methods using the k−ε turbulence model and experimental data for test case 1 (Re = 5600) at (a) the pipe midpoint and (b) the location of the valve

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Comparison between the pressure head values computed using the MFWC and MFW methods using the k−ω turbulence model and experimental data for test case 1 (Re = 5600) at (a) the pipe midpoint and (b) the location of the valve

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Comparison between the pressure head values computed using the MFWC and MFW methods using the k−ε turbulence model and experimental data for test case 2 (Re = 15,800) at (a) the pipe midpoint and (b) the location of the valve

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Comparison between the pressure head values computed using the MFWC and MFW methods using the k−ω turbulence model and experimental data for test case 2 (Re = 15,800) at (a) the pipe midpoint and (b) the location of the valve

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Kinematic eddy viscosity profiles at the pipe midpoint for different water hammer time cycles using the k−ε turbulence model for (a) test case 1 (Re = 5600) and (b) test case 2 (Re = 15,800)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Kinematic eddy viscosity profiles at the pipe midpoint for different water hammer time cycles using the k−ω turbulence model for (a) test case 1 (Re = 5600) and (b) test case 2 (Re = 15,800)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Turbulent kinetic energy profiles at the pipe midpoint for different water hammer time cycles using the k−ε turbulence model and MFWC approach for (a) test case 1 (Re = 5600) and (b) test case 2 (Re = 15,800)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Calculated dissipation rates at the pipe midpoint for different water hammer time cycles using the k−ε turbulence model and MFWC approach for (a) test case 1 (Re = 5600) and (b) test case 2 (Re = 15,800)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Turbulent kinetic energy calculations at the pipe midpoint for different water hammer time cycles using the k−ω turbulence model and MFWC approach for (a) test case 1 (Re = 5600) and (b) test case 2 (Re = 15,800)

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