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Research Papers: Fundamental Issues and Canonical Flows

Acoustic Response of Multiple Shallow Cavities and Prediction of Self-Excited Acoustic Oscillations

[+] Author and Article Information
Ayman A. Shaaban

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McMaster University,
1280 Main Street West, JHE Lab 108A,
Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada
e-mail: shaabaaa@mcmaster.ca

Samir Ziada

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McMaster University,
1280 Main Street West, JHE Lab 108A,
Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada
e-mail: ziadas@mcmaster.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received November 4, 2017; final manuscript received February 22, 2018; published online April 19, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Pierre E. Sullivan.

J. Fluids Eng 140(9), 091203 (Apr 19, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: FE-17-1718; doi: 10.1115/1.4039516 History: Received November 04, 2017; Revised February 22, 2018

Self-sustaining oscillations of flow over ducted cavities and in corrugated pipes are a known source of tonal noise and excessive vibration in industrial applications. Corrugated pipes can be modeled as a series of axisymmetric cavities. In the current study, the aero-acoustic sources generated by one-, two-, and three-cavity configurations have been experimentally investigated by means of the standing wave method (SWM) for a wide range of Strouhal numbers and acoustic excitation levels. The source strength is found to increase in a nonlinear manner with increasing the number of cavities. Moreover, the self-excited acoustic resonances of the same cavity combinations are investigated. The source characteristics are compared with the observed lock-in range from the self-excited experiments. A prediction model is also developed to utilize the measured source characteristics for estimating the amplitude of the cavities self-sustained oscillations. The self-excited experimental data are used to assess the effect of acoustic absorption at the cavity edges. This absorption is found to be substantial and must be accounted for in the prediction model. When the model is supplemented with appropriate loss coefficients, it predicts fairly well the pulsation amplitude within the resonance lock-in range of the studied multiple cavity configurations.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the externally excited experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the self-excited experimental setup

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Fig. 3

Sketch of the multiple cavities configuration in the current study

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Fig. 4

The residual error percentage for upstream microphones at different Strouhal numbers for the three-cavity configuration. Data points at the same Strouhal number represent different excitation levels.

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Fig. 5

Real source term versus Strouhal number for different acoustic velocity ratios for the two-cavity configuration

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Fig. 6

Real source term versus acoustic velocity ratio for different Strouhal numbers for the three-cavity configuration

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Fig. 7

Imaginary source term versus Strouhal number for different acoustic velocity ratios for the two-cavity configuration

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Fig. 8

Real source term versus Strouhal number for different number of cavities at v/U = 0.002, 0.01, and 0.1

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Fig. 9

The change in the peak source with the increasing number of multiple cavities for different excitation levels

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Fig. 10

Self-excited normalized pressure amplitude versus Strouhal number for one, two, and three cavities

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Fig. 11

Self-excited lock-in frequency versus Strouhal number for one, two, and three cavities

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Fig. 12

Experimental versus predicted dimensionless amplitude for the single cavity in the short piping system

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Fig. 13

Experimental versus predicted dimensionless amplitude for the single cavity in the long piping system

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Fig. 14

Experimental versus predicted dimensionless amplitude for the two-cavity configuration

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Fig. 15

Experimental versus predicted dimensionless amplitude for the three-cavity configuration

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